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Home > Publications > Quill > What's Your Personal Code of Ethics?



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Thursday, April 11, 2013
What's Your Personal Code of Ethics?

By Scott Leadingham

SPJís Code of Ethics is among the most cited codes for journalism professionals, but there are certainly more from other organizations and news outlets. These codes are mostly starting points to guide ethical decision-making. Often the gray areas of journalism ethics require your own additional thought process. So, we ask, whatís your personal code of ethics? Are there more points you use to steer your own work? What, in addition to SPJís Code or other institutional rules, do you follow?

Tell us. No, really. Tell us. Here.

Weíll highlight more in Quill and online in the future.

As an example, we asked Steve Buttry, digital transformation editor at Digital First Media and a frequent writer on journalism ethics topics, to give us his personal code of ethics:

"MY PERSONAL CODE" BY STEVE BUTTRY:

A journalistís job is pretty much like a witnessís oath in court: to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. This goes deeper and broader than the call in codes of ethics to seek and report the truth. We must tell the whole truth about our reporting: showing our work and linking to our sources (including the competition). We must tell the whole truth about connections and experiences that might influence our reporting. This means acknowledging that we are humans with biases and opinions, not insisting that weíre objects. We must tell nothing but the truth. This means that we donít settle for the faux balance of he-said-she-said journalism, but dig for verification and learn who is telling the truth. We must fact-check and call out the liars who too often use media as megaphones.

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