SPJ News http://www.spj.org/ SPJ Delivers Today's Media News en-us Copyright 2006 Society of Professional Journalists 1440 St. Louis Post-Dispatch, ProPublica earn SPJ Ethics in Journalism Awards http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1901 CONTACT:<br> Lou Harry, SPJ Manager of Publications and Awards, 317-920-4786, <email address="lharry@spj.org">lharry@spj.org</a><br> Zoë Berg, SPJ Communications Specialist, 317-920-4785, <email address="zberg@spj.org">zberg@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – The <a href=https://www.spj.org/>Society of Professional Journalists</a> is bestowing its <a href=https://www.spj.org/a-ethics.asp>Ethics in Journalism Award</a> on two reporters – Hannah Dreyfus of ProPublica and Josh Renaud of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Dreyfus is being recognized for the project “<a href=https://www.propublica.org/article/the-liberty-way-how-liberty-university-discourages-and-dismisses-students-reports-of-sexual-assaults>The Liberty Way</a>,” examining how Liberty University responds to students who report cases of rape. Renaud is being recognized for <a href=https://www.stltoday.com/news/local/education/missouri-teachers-social-security-numbers-at-risk-on-state-agency-s-website/article_f3339700-ece0-54a1-9a45-f300321b7c82.html>reporting on potential exposures of social security numbers of Missouri teachers</a>, through the state’s Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s web site.<br> <br> This award honors journalists or news organizations that perform in an outstanding ethical manner demonstrating the ideals of the <a href=https://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp>SPJ Code of Ethics</a>. <br> <br> Dreyfus’ reporting for ProPublica centered on the culture of Liberty University, the largest private evangelical university in Virginia, and how it responded to students’ accusations of rape and sexual assault. University officials required students to sign paperwork saying they violated “The Liberty Way,” the moral code by the school that forbids fraternizing with the opposite sex. Further, students interviewed by university investigators told Dreyfus that they twisted testimony to smear women who reported cases of rape.<br> <br> The university did not reply to Dreyfus’ inquiries, while she corroborated the stories that she heard through more than 50 interviews with former students and staffers at Liberty, as well as former and current police officers at the university. In addition, Dreyfus examined school, medical and police records, as well as methodical collections of photo evidence. <br> <br> In the letter nominating Dreyfus’ reporting, Stephen Engelberg, editor-in-chief of ProPublica, said she met “the immeasurable challenge” of gaining and maintaining the trust of sources during the fact-checking process, and embraced unpredictability through reporting sensitive and trauma-ridden subject matter, as sources considered whether or not to share their stories publicly.<br> <br> Engelberg said ProPublica was diligent to minimize harm to sources through interviews in a trauma-informed manner, respecting the sources’ boundaries and featuring evidence that had since been removed from the file by officials, who deemed it to be too explicit. <br> <br> “We understood the gravity of the situation, not just in terms of what was on the line for our publication and the integrity of our reporting, but what a misstep it could mean for the national movement towards accountability for rape on campus,” Engelberg wrote.<br> <br> Once the story was published, Senators called on the U.S. Department of Education to investigate Liberty, and the university’s board voted to open a review of the school office that was in charge of handling complaints of discrimination and abuse.<br> <br> Renaud’s reporting in the Post-Dispatch centered on the possibility that social security numbers of teachers may have been exposed on the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s website when members of the public looked up the credentials of teachers, counselors and school administrators. Renaud notified state officials in fall 2021 of the problem and said he would not publish a story on the subject until state officials took action. <br> <br> After assurance from state officials that the site was secure, the story ran on Oct. 14 in the Post-Dispatch and its website the evening prior. The same day, Missouri Gov. Mike Parson announced a criminal investigation of both Renaud and the paper. The state education department called Renaud a “hacker” and Parson said the individual who alerted the Department of the problem was trying to “embarrass the state and sell headlines for their news outlet.”<br> <br> Parson’s political action committee launched a fundraising video highlighting his criticism, suggesting Renaud was “digging around” in personal data about teachers, while the PAC praised Parson for standing up to “the state’s fake news factory.” Emails seen by the Post-Dispatch originally showed that the agency planned to thank Renaud for highlighting the problem instead of labelling him as a “hacker.”<br> <br> Yet, the problem was not just exclusive to teacher certifications. Renaud's initial report noted that as far back as 2015, Missouri’s state auditor raised concerns about education-related data practices at the Department, specifically that students’ social security numbers and other personally identifiable information was being stored in the Missouri Student Information System. Additional reporting found that the state’s computer systems were so outdated that officials were worried that no one would know how to work with the technology once the programmers familiar with this technology retired, and that the governor and legislature have barely invested in updating the infrastructure.<br> <br> Parson ordered the Missouri State Highway Patrol’s digital forensic unit to investigate. In February, seven weeks after the Patrol submitted their report, the Cole County, Missouri, prosecutor announced that Renaud and the Post-Dispatch would not face charges.<br> <br> Marcia Koenig, former interim editor of the Post-Dispatch, nominated Renaud “for his solid instincts in recognizing a problem, his professionalism in reporting on it and his perseverance through months of political attack.”<br> <br> Dreyfus and Renaud will be honored during the President's Installation Banquet at <a href=https://mediafest22.org/>MediaFest22</a>, SPJ’s annual convention, in Washington, D.C., Oct. 29.<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center> Thu, 22 Sep 2022 00:00:00 -0500 El Paso Matters, Insider, ProPublica, Jonathan Guyer named SPJ Sunshine Award winners http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1900 CONTACT:<br> Lou Harry, SPJ Manager of Publications and Awards, 317-920-4786, <email address="lharry@spj.org">lharry@spj.org</a><br> Zoë Berg, SPJ Communications Specialist, 317-920-4785, <email address="zberg@spj.org">zberg@spj.org</a><br> <br> <i>This release was updated to include more information. </i> <br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – The <a href=https://www.spj.org/index.asp>Society of Professional Journalists</a> has named four recipients – El Paso Matters, Insider, ProPublica and Jonathan Guyer — as winners of its annual <a href=https://www.spj.org/a-sunshine.asp>Sunshine Award</a>.<br> <br> A judging panel, composed of members of the SPJ <a href=https://www.spj.org/com-foi.asp>Freedom of Information Committee</a> and <a href=https://www.spj.org/spjboard.asp>Board of Directors</a>, bestow these awards each year to individuals and organizations for their notable contributions to open government.<br> <br> <b>El Paso Matters</b><br> <br> In 2018, freelance journalist Robert Moore filed a series of Freedom of Information Act queries with the U.S. Departments of Homeland Security and Health and Human Services pertaining to immigration issues at the U.S.-Mexico border. The agencies did not respond to the requests. <br> <br> Moore, who was in the process of establishing El Paso Matters, a nonprofit news site, filed a lawsuit in federal court in November 2019. Moore pursued the lawsuit without the support of a major news organization. El Paso attorneys Chris Benoit and Lynn Coyle agreed to file the suit and accept only the fees that could be recovered from the federal government.<br> <br> In January 2021, a federal judge ordered DHS and HHS to provide all the requested documents within a few months. When Moore, Benoit and Coyle determined that the redactions in the documents were inappropriate, they prepared for a September 2021 trial, only for the government to lift the redactions that were being challenged the eve before the trial was to start. The government also agreed to pay Moore’s legal fees.<br> <br> The documents produced two major stories, published in 2021, about the performance of the U.S. border enforcement system. One brought to light a <a href=https://elpasomatters.org/2021/05/26/circus-is-coming-to-town-how-the-el-paso-border-patrols-2018-election-day-plan-unraveled/>military exercise near a Hispanic neighborhood</a> on Election Day 2018 designed to get media attention. The other focused on the decision by the Trump Administration <a href=https://elpasomatters.org/2021/09/28/cbp-turned-away-asylum-seekers-claiming-they-didnt-have-room-for-them-it-often-wasnt-true/>justifying its policy of turning back asylum seekers</a> due to unavailable detention spaces at ports of entry, when spaces were routinely available.<br> <br> <b>Insider</b><br> <br> The investigative reporting project <a href=https://www.businessinsider.com/financial-conflicts-congress-members-rated-2021-12?r=US&IR=T>“Conflicted Congress”</a> considered the enforcement of the Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge Act of 2012, or STOCK Act, designed to boost Congressional ethical standards and transparency surrounding a member’s personal finances and investments. Over the course of five months, over 9,000 financial disclosure statements were collected and analyzed by over 40 reporters, editors, data journalists and researchers.<br> <br> The project found that 59 members of Congress and 182 senior congressional staff members violated the Act in recent months. It also found that 75 lawmakers held stocks in either Pfizer, Moderna, Johnson and Johnson or all three during 2020. These stocks were bought or sold during the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic by members of Congress. <br> <br> The project also rated members of Congress on how they complied with conflict of interest laws, avoided conflicts and rated their commitments to transparency. This was done through a searchable and sortable database that could be used by the public and others in the media. Since Insider’s reporting was released, calls were made by various politicians to institute a congressional ban on stock trading – a move that has garnered bipartisan support and calls for action by congressional leadership. Separately, some members of Congress have voluntarily stopped trading stocks.<br> <br> The reporting has since been picked up by local and national media, including The New York Times, the Boston Globe, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Albany Times Union. <br> <br> <b>ProPublica</b><br> <br> Reporter Neil Bedi began reporting on defects surrounding the HeartWare Ventricular Assist Device after finding a pattern in the public data that looks at device malfunctions and product recalls held by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Bedi’s reporting found that the FDA had received thousands of reports of suspicious deaths and injuries linked to the device. Bedi worked through over 1,000 anonymous reports to identify deaths of patients resulting from device malfunctions.<br> <br> In addition, in documents written by federal inspectors and obtained by ProPublica, the government knew about problems with the device’s manufacturer, and the government continued to pay for the device, even though the company, Medtronic, did not meet federal standards. The reporting <a href=https://www.propublica.org/article/a-high-risk-medical-device-didnt-meet-federal-standards-the-government-paid-millions-for-more>exposed gaps in the government’s regulation of medical devices</a> and showed the increased danger posed to vulnerable patients, who often have no means of recourse. <br> <br> As Medtronic, by law, is shielded from lawsuits, Bedi and engagement reporters Maya Miller and Maryam Jameel reached out to current HeartWare patients through online communities and support groups. Patients who were interviewed could not replace the devices with alternative pumps due to the risks of the required open-heart surgery. <br> <br> The reporting about the FDA’s data practices, combined with the stories from the patients, led to a Congressional inquiry from the House Oversight Committee and Medtronic reaching out to patients and offering expanded financial assistance to them.<br> <br> <b>Jonathan Guyer</b><br> <br> Last year, The American Prospect’s Jonathan Guyer set out to expose how national security decision-making works in President Joe Biden’s inner circle with a laser focus on severely undercovered corporate backgrounds. Guyer published numerous articles on how strategic consultants <a href=https://prospect.org/power/meet-the-consulting-firm-staffing-biden-administration-westexec/>were appointed as foreign-policy leaders</a>.<br> <br> Guyer analyzed hundreds of pages of government ethics filings, obtained leaked corporate documents, mined social-media posts and interviewed dozens of watchdogs, ethics experts and current and former officials to find the information to use in his reporting. His reporting revealed that most senior Biden foreign-policy officials held down jobs in think tanks, academia and as strategic consultants, but that they <a href=https://prospect.org/power/biden-adviser-jake-sullivan-think-tanker-scholar-consultant/>frequently concealed the much more lucrative private-sector jobs</a> in press releases and nomination announcements.<br> <br> To reach new audiences, Guyer hosted public panels and joined radio programs. On social media, he shared new findings from the latest documents published by the Office of Government Ethics. <br> <br> Guyer’s sustained attention to ultra-connected firms had led to several resignations. In response to Guyer’s reporting in July 2020, then-Biden campaign adviser Tony Blinken withdrew as managing partner of the firm he co-founded, WestExec Advisors, and its related private equity firm, and Jake Sullivan, Biden’s national-security adviser, left Macro Advisory Partners.<br> <br> Winners will be honored during the President's Installation Banquet at <a href=https://mediafest22.org/>MediaFest22</a>, SPJ’s annual convention, in Washington, D.C., Oct. 29.<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center> Wed, 21 Sep 2022 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ selects 10 students for MediaFest22’s SPJ News team http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1898 CONTACT:<br> Rebecca Aguilar, SPJ National President, 317-361-4134, <email address="rebeccaaguilar50@gmail.com">rebeccaaguilar50@gmail.com</a><br> Zoë Berg, SPJ Communications Specialist, 317-920-4785, <email address="zberg@spj.org">zberg@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — The <a href=https://www.spj.org/>Society of Professional Journalists</a> has selected ten college students and recent graduates to be a part of the SPJ News team at <a href=https://mediafest22.org/>MediaFest22</a>. They will work closely with three professional journalists to cover everything happening at the convention in Washington, D.C., Oct. 27-30. <br> <br> The SPJ News team includes young journalists from colleges and universities across the country. They have experience working for their school media outlets as well as professional news organizations. Students and graduates on the SPJ News team are Carolyn Burt, Olivia Cohen, Edward Franco, Jasmine Franklin, Brooklyn Joyner, De’Vante Martin, Brenda Payan-Garcia, Alexis “Lexi” Rogers, Sophie Schulz and Megan Woolard. <br> <br> The SPJ News mentors this year include Brian Collister, an Emmy award-winning investigative reporter in Texas; Bob Butler, a general assignment reporter at KCBS Radio in San Francisco; and Nicolle Sartain, the editor at the News Courier in Athens, Alabama. <br> <br> “We’re excited to provide these young student journalists the opportunity to report on the speakers, sessions and events happening at MediaFest22,” said SPJ National President Rebecca Aguilar. “The SPJ News experience will help the students build on their experiences in journalism that can hopefully lead them to good jobs in the future.” <br> <br> The SPJ News team’s work will be <a href=https://thespjnews.org/>posted online</a> and shared on social media with #SPJNews22.<br> <br> <b>Carolyn Burt</b> is an audience engagement journalist located in Los Angeles. She was a part of the Los Angeles Times Internship Class of 2022 where she worked on the audience engagement team. Burt is a journalism major at California State University, Northridge. While at CSUN, she was the managing editor for the Daily Sundial. Previously she held the position of editor-in-chief for the Corsair, Santa Monica College’s student-run news publication. <br> <br> <b>Olivia Cohen</b> is a journalism major at Columbia College, Chicago, and is anticipated to graduate in May 2024. Cohen is the managing editor for her school's student newspaper, the Columbia Chronicle, and will move into the editor-in-chief role in December. Cohen has bylines in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, the Chicago Sun-Times and the Gateway Journalism Review. She aspires to be an investigative reporter, concentrating in public health reporting.<br> <br> <b>Edward Franco</b> will graduate in May 2025 from New York University as a broadcast journalism major. He is currently interning for NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt and has been a news production intern for CBS Orlando News 6 through the Emma Bowen Foundation Fellowship. Franco is also the video director for Washington Square News, NYU’s independent newspaper. He is proud to be a Colombian American who hopes to become a television reporter covering politics, education and transportation. <br> <br> <b>Jasmine Franklin</b> is an award-winning news reporter studying broadcast journalism at Grambling State University. The Chicago-area native is currently an intern for ABC News. She also works as a part-time multimedia journalist at KNOE 8 News in Monroe, Louisiana. Franklin will graduate this December. <br> <br> <b>Brooklyn Joyner</b> is a broadcast journalism senior at Loyola University of New Orleans. She is a native New Orleanian and chose journalism as a career path because it gives her the option to remain a student for the rest of her life. Joyner interned with Hearst Media Company and, in the summer of 2022, served as a multimedia student at the National Association of Black Journalists conference. She currently works part-time position with a local news station, WDSU. <br> <br> <b>De’Vante Martin</b> is from St. Joseph, Louisiana. He is a senior mass communication major at Grambling State University. Some of his accomplishments include being the valedictorian of his high school and being a member of Earl Lester Cole Honors College at GSU. He is also proud of being news editor and sports editor for The Gramblinite.<br> <br> <b>Brenda Payan-Garcia</b> is a public relations major at California State University, Long Beach. She is the editor-in-chief of the first and only Spanish magazine in the city of Long Beach. Payan-Garcia will graduate in May 2023 and hopes to create long term policy change as well as work with foundations to help the less fortunate and underrepresented communities.<br> <br> <b>Alexis “Lexi” Rogers</b> is a journalism major and justice minor at American University. She is on the School of Communication Undergraduate Council and the Black Student Union Executive Board. Rogers hopes to become a political reporter or legal analyst on television. She will graduate in May 2025. <br> <br> <b>Sophie Schulz</b> was born and raised in Minnesota. She is currently majoring in anthropology and minoring in journalism at Wagner College in New York City. Schutz is also involved in the student newspaper, the Wagnerian, and is part of the on-campus environmental club, Earth.<br> <br> <b>Megan Woolard</b> is junior studying journalism and English literature at Marquette University. She is currently serving as the managing editor of Marquette Tribune. Woolard will graduate in the spring of 2024.<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center> Fri, 16 Sep 2022 00:00:00 -0500 Jack Lail recognized for outstanding contributions to SPJ with Howard S. Dubin Award http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1897 CONTACT:<br> Lou Harry, SPJ Manager of Publications and Awards, 317-920-4786, <email address="lharry@spj.org">lharry@spj.org</a><br> Zoë Berg, SPJ Communications Specialist, 317-920-4785, <email address="zberg@spj.org">zberg@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – The <a href=https://www.spj.org/>Society of Professional Journalists</a> has selected Jack Lail to receive the <a href=https://www.spj.org/a-dubin.asp>Howard S. Dubin Outstanding Pro Member Award</a> for contributions to his SPJ chapter.<br> <br> Each year, the Dubin award is given to no more than two members – one from a chapter of 75 or more members and one from a chapter of 75 or less members. The award is named in honor of Howard Dubin, a longtime member of SPJ’s Headline Club in Chicago. Dubin not only contributes time and money to the Society, but also remains dedicated at the chapter level and as Treasurer of the <a href=https://www.spj.org/foundation-board.asp>SPJ Foundation Board of Directors</a>.<br> <br> Lail is a board member of the <a href=https://etspj.org/>East Tennessee Pro Chapter</a>. A retired journalist, he was formerly was the digital manager at WATE-TV, the ABC affiliate in Knoxville, and was previously the digital director for over two decades at the Knoxville News Sentinel. <br> <br> Lail joined SPJ in 1984 after arriving in Tennessee and served as chapter president during the 1990s. He also served on a national technology committee and was later its president. <br> <br> Passionate about professional development training opportunities for journalists, Lail organized sessions for SPJ national conventions. Outside of SPJ, he conducted professional opportunities for the American Press Institute and the Poynter Institute, as well as internal training for Gannett, the E.W. Scripps Company and the Journal Media Group. He was also a board member of the Associated Press Media Editors and organized sessions for their annual conference.<br> <br> Lail has been a financial supporter of the SPJ Foundation and <a href=https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp>Legal Defense Fund</a> and the East Tennessee Pro Chapter’s Front Page Foundation, and was a member of SPJ’s President’s Club for several years. <br> <br> Lail is to serve as president of the East Tennessee Pro Chapter during the 2023-2024 year.<br> <br> “Jack exemplifies Howard Dubin in one strong and important way: He has been a long-time member, served as president of his local chapter, chaired a national committee, helped organize sessions at national conventions and is now back as a very active grassroots member and officer of the local chapter,” wrote Jean Ash, Maria Cornelius and Georgiana Vines, current board members of the East Tennessee Pro Chapter, in their letter nominating Lail. “The East Tennessee Pro Chapter feels that Jack is the ‘glue’ that holds its members together with his ability to keep the website current, organize social media announcements and handle all aspects of the Golden Press Cards awards program that recognizes outstanding journalism throughout East Tennessee. He does it with calmness and professionalism in the face of any obstacles that come up.”<br> <br> Lail will be honored during the President's Installation Banquet at <a href=https://mediafest22.org/>MediaFest22</a> in Washington, D.C., Oct. 29.<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center> Thu, 15 Sep 2022 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ grateful for the dismissal of charges against Oregon journalist http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1896 CONTACT:<br> Rebecca Aguilar, SPJ National President, 317-361-4134, <email address="rebeccaaguilar50@gmail.com">rebeccaaguilar50@gmail.com</a><br> Zoë Berg, SPJ Communications Specialist, 317-920-4785, <email address="zberg@spj.org">zberg@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — The <a href=https://www.spj.org/>Society of Professional Journalists</a> is grateful that a judge <a href= https://www.rcfp.org/april-ehrlich-charges-dropped/>dismissed all charges</a> against Oregon Public Broadcasting journalist April Fonseca Ehrlich, who was arrested two years ago while covering the police removal of houseless campers from a public park.<br> <br> SPJ and its <a href=https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp>Legal Defense Fund</a> have been active and vocal in defending Ehelich’s right to report the truth. SPJ joined a large coalition of news outlets and press freedom groups led by <a href=https://www.rcfp.org/>The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press</a>.<br> <br> “It is crucial that reporters covering law enforcement operations can do their job without barriers. Gathering the facts means seeing what is happening, which is what April Ehrlich did when covering the September 2020 police removal of houseless campers from a park,” said SPJ National President Rebecca Aguilar. “We appreciate the judge on this case and for understanding the role of the local media and the reporter's goal only to inform the public with accurate information.”<br> <br> Ehrlich was arrested on Sept. 22, 2020, while covering evictions at Hawthorne Park for NPR affiliate Jefferson Public Radio. Police had instructed the media to move to a “media staging area,” but Ehrlich moved to get closer to get an accurate report. At the time of her arrest, <a href=https://www.ijpr.org/media-society/2020-09-23/jpr-statement-on-the-arrest-of-reporter-april-ehrlich-at-the-hawthorne-park-camp-sweep>Jefferson Public Radio said in a statement</a> that the staging area was located “where it was not possible to adequately see or hear interactions between police officers and campers, or gather audio.”<br> <br> The trial <a href=https://ashland.news/trial-set-for-reporter-arrested-during-park-camper-evictions-in-medford/>was scheduled for Sept. 16 and 19</a>, but the two misdemeanor charges — trespass and resisting arrest — were dismissed shortly before the trial was set to begin.<br> <br> SPJ’s LDF is a unique account that can be tapped for providing journalists with legal or direct financial assistance. The primary role of the Fund is to initiate and support litigation that enforces public access to government records and proceedings, which can be the most expensive way to defend the First Amendment. The fund can also be a source of support for Freedom of Information hotlines, coalitions and newsletters, as well as for legislative lobbying activities aimed at enforcing public access to government records and proceedings.<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center> Fri, 9 Sep 2022 00:00:00 -0500 Sara Stanley named Galvan Outstanding Graduate in Journalism recipient http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1894 CONTACT:<br> Lou Harry, SPJ Manager of Publications and Awards, 317-920-4786, <email address="lharry@spj.org">lharry@spj.org</a> <br> Michelle Lagos, SPJ Communications Coordinator, 317-927-8000, <email address="@spj.org">mlagos@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – The <a href=https://www.spj.org/index.asp>Society of Professional Journalists</a> is honored to present Sara Stanley with the 2022 <a href=https://www.spj.org/a-galvan.asp>Julie Galvan Outstanding Graduate in Journalism Award</a>. Stanley graduated from Western Carolina University, where she served as the SPJ chapter president and was the editor-in-chief for The Western Carolinian. <br> <br> This award honors a graduate in journalism who has excelled in their class based on character, service to the community, scholarship, proficiency in practical journalism and contribution to their SPJ chapter. <br> <br> Stanley has proven to be an outstanding student. Many of her professors say her commitment to academic excellence is undeniable. She demonstrates a unique ability to adapt and excel in any project she receives, displaying a great range of skills from on-air talent to working behind the scenes on production. <br> <br> "Sara is truly one of the most exceptional students with whom I have worked with in the past four decades," said Pamela Meister, director of the Mountain Heritage Center at WCU. "In addition to her talent, intelligence and energy, she is also highly ethical and always looking for opportunities to bring people together and create positive change in the world around her." <br> <br> In addition to her academic achievements, Stanley has been an active member of her community on and off campus. In spring 2021, Stanley worked as virtual projects coordinator, assisting staff in creating virtual exhibit projects. In addition, she worked with the Sylva Herald, a nearby town's local newspaper, the Western Carolina Journalist and served as editor-in-chief of the Western Carolinian. As editor-in-chief, Stanley helped the publication resume printing hard copies and maintained the publication's website by gaining additional funding from the university and obtaining ads from the local community. <br> <br> Stanley has devoted herself to journalistic excellence as she developed award-winning stories. She was also recognized as a finalist for the <a href=https://www.spj.org/a-moe.asp>SPJ Mark of Excellence award</a> for her data journalism and food insecurity work. <br> <br> "Her commitment to journalism, to inform her audience and make their life better, her drive to make a change will have a lasting impact in every community she continues to work," said Katerina Spasovska, associate professor at WCU. "Sara is a smart, persistent and brave reporter; she improved and impacted our community and I know she will continue to do the same in any community [where] she goes." <br> <br> Furthermore, Stanley has been an exceptional mentor and a valuable asset to her university. Debra Connelly, a visiting assistant professor in the communications department at WCU, said Stanley's in-depth knowledge made her an essential asset for students in radio and television production classes, design and journalism. Stanley was capable of handling students' needs and questions, as her extensive knowledge and dependability enabled her to go above and beyond for her peers. <br> <br> "I am very excited to see where her career takes her, though I will admit that the university and the community is losing a great resource when she walks across the stage," said Matt Binford, assistant professor of practice at WCU. "Her drive to tell stories that the community needs to hear, her work ethic and her dedication to local journalism will be greatly missed."<br> <br> Stanley will be recognized at the Student Summit & Awards Program at <a href=https://mediafest22.org/>MediaFest22</a> in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 28. <br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center> Thu, 8 Sep 2022 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ statement on Jeff German’s death http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1895 CONTACT:<br> Rebecca Aguilar, SPJ National President, 317-361-4134, <email address="rebeccaaguilar50@gmail.com">rebeccaaguilar50@gmail.com</a><br> Zoë Berg, SPJ Communications Specialist, 317-920-4785, <email address="zberg@spj.org">zberg@spj.org</a><br> <br> A statement from <a href=https://www.spj.org/>Society of Professional Journalists</a> National President Rebecca Aguilar:<br> <br> “The <a href=https://www.reviewjournal.com/crime/homicides/review-journal-investigative-reporter-jeff-german-killed-outside-home-2634323/>murder of Jeff German </a> is a reminder that everyday journalists around the world put their lives on the line to uncover the truth. We are saddened by the murder of the veteran investigative reporter at the Las Vegas Review-Journal and thankful that Las Vegas law enforcement has <a href=https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2022/sep/07/journalist-stabbing-las-vegas-jeff-german>arrested a suspect in this case</a>. <br> <br> “As the Review-Journal reported, many described Jeff as a fearless reporter, the embodiment of the First Amendment, who stood up for society's underdogs and had a strong sense of right and wrong. We should honor Jeff by continuing to be like him, a person of courage, compassion and commitment to the truth. <br> <br> “We at SPJ send our condolences to Jeff's colleagues at the Las Vegas Review-Journal, family and friends. May he rest in peace.”<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center> Thu, 8 Sep 2022 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ 2022 Diversity Fellows announced http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1893 CONTACT:<br> Lou Harry, SPJ Manager of Publications and Awards, 317-920-4786, <email address="lharry@spj.org">lharry@spj.org</a><br> Zoë Berg, SPJ Communications Specialist, 317-920-4785, <email address="zberg@spj.org">zberg@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — The <a href=https://www.spj.org/c-grant-diversity.asp>Dori Maynard Diversity Leadership Program</a> 2022 Diversity Fellows are Stephanie Casanova, Jordan Gass-Pooré, Wilton Jackson, Lori Lizarraga, Narda Pérez, Leslie Rangel, Michelle Watson and Saraya Wintersmith. This program aims to open minds and open doors in newsrooms around the country by giving fellows the opportunity to see first-hand how the <a href=https://www.spj.org/index.asp>Society of Professional Journalists</a> works and what it has to offer.<br> <br> The fellows will attend <a href=https://mediafest22.org/>MediaFest22</a> in Washington, D.C., Oct. 27-30, where they will have access to networking events, meet SPJ leaders at the national and local levels and interact with other leaders in journalism who are making an impact in areas of diversity, equity and inclusion.<br> <br> “The Diversity Leadership Program fellowship is <a href=https://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1344>named after the late Dori J. Maynard</a>. She was a strong champion of diversity in journalism,” said SPJ National President Rebecca Aguilar. “I am confident she would be proud of the SPJ Diversity Leadership program we have today that provides journalists of diverse backgrounds the tools and know-how they need to survive and thrive in the news business."<br> <br> Maynard was an SPJ Foundation Board member beginning in 1999. In 2001, she was named an SPJ <a href=https://www.spj.org/a-fellowsOTS.asp>Fellow of the Society</a>. Maynard was well-known for tirelessly working to ensure diversity in the newsroom. She challenged the news media to look at themselves and what she called “distorted coverage of communities of color” when covering America’s ongoing racial struggles and the impact it has on the country.<br> <br> “It's encouraging to know that we continue to advance Dori Maynard’s vision for diversity and inclusion by selecting this year’s journalists to participate in the SPJ Diversity Leadership Fellowship,” said SPJ Diversity & Inclusion Committee Chair Eleanore Vega. “We have eight excellent fellows from all over the country who will benefit greatly from this program.”<br> <br> <b>Stephanie Casanova</b> is a criminal justice and breaking news reporter at the Chicago Tribune. Starting her career in 2014, she's been a reporter and copy editor for local newspapers in South Dakota, Kansas and Arizona. Casanova has participated in SPJ's Future Leaders Academy and mentored college students in SPJ's Student Leadership Institute. She is a Maynard 200 alumni, a Maynard Institute for Journalism Education training program for journalists of color that focuses on making newsrooms more equitable, diverse and anti-racist. Casanova is a Spanish-speaking bilingual journalist passionate about inclusive storytelling and reflects the diversity of the communities she covers. <br> <br> <b>Jordan Gass-Pooré</b> is an award-winning podcast producer and investigative journalist with more than a decade of journalism experience. Presently, Gass-Pooré is the creator, producer, reporter and host of “Hazard NJ,” a limited-series podcast about the impacts of climate change on hazardous Superfund sites in New Jersey. “Hazard NJ” is a production of NJ Spotlight News, the news division of NJ PBS, and is the outlet’s first podcast. Prior to this, she was a producer with CNN’s podcasts, “Chasing Life” and “Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction,” both hosted by Sanjay Gupta.<br> <br> <b>Wilton Jackson II</b> is a writer for Sports Illustrated who covers breaking news in sports and writes features and columns. Previously Jackson was a breaking and trending reporter for The Clarion Ledger in Jackson, Mississippi. He covered crime, education, business, features and COVID-19. He also covered college and high school sports in the Jackson metro area. Jackson is also an adjunct journalism professor and has a master’s degree from Louisiana State University. He is a member of SPJ, the National Association of Black Journalists, where he has served in previous leadership roles, and a proud member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.<br> <br> <b>Lori Lizarraga</b> is an Ecuadorian-Mexican-American journalist and a Murrow and Emmy-awarded reporter. Her news journey began in her home state of Texas and has since taken her to California, Colorado and on international assignment to Ecuador. In 2021, Lizarraga’s reporting on diversity in the news forced into effect new standards of immigration coverage in newsrooms across the country. She is now based in Philadelphia where she continues her work as a community journalist and podcast producer.<br> <br> <b>Narda Pérez</b> is an audience development strategist at The New York Times' Wirecutter, where she focuses on social strategy. She graduated in 2019 from the University of Texas at Arlington with degrees in broadcast communications and public relations. Before Wirecutter, Pérez was on the audience team at The Dallas Morning News. She has previously served on the board of DFW Hispanic Communicators, the Dallas-Fort Worth chapter of National Association of Hispanic Journalists. <br> <br> <b>Leslie Rangel</b> is the co-anchor of “Good Day Austin” at Fox 7. The award-winning journalist is a former crime reporter at KXAN News has also worked at KFOR-TV in Oklahoma City and KFDM News in Beaumont, Texas. Rangel has been recognized for her work by the Texas Associated Press of Broadcasters. She graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with a degree in broadcast journalism and in Spanish language teaching. She is also a registered yoga teacher. <br> <br> <b>Michelle Watson</b> is a national news editor for CNN's national newsgathering team. Before joining CNN's national desk, Watson worked to vet and research stories for The Row, CNN's editorial judgment body. Since joining CNN in 2017, Watson has played a role in many major stories for CNN, including the network's coverage of the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Irma after it made landfall and the tragic shooting deaths of 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. She also worked with CNN's political team fact-checking the 2020 presidential election.<br> <br> <b>Saraya Wintersmith</b> covers Boston City Hall for GBH News. Before that, she covered the Dorchester, Roxbury and Mattapan neighborhoods, focusing on how people live and the issues that shaped those communities. Prior to joining GBH News, Wintersmith worked as a statehouse reporter, producing radio and television stories for WCVE-TV, now VPM Media Corporation, in Richmond, Virginia. Wintersmith holds a journalism degree from Howard University.<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center> Tue, 6 Sep 2022 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ selects Dorothy Bland, University of North Texas professor, for Distinguished Teaching in Journalism Award http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1892 CONTACT:<br> Lou Harry, SPJ Manager of Publications and Awards, 317-920-4786, <email address="lharry@spj.org">lharry@spj.org</a> <br> Michelle Lagos, SPJ Communications Coordinator, 317-927-8000, <email address="@spj.org">mlagos@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – The <a href="https://www.spj.org">Society of Professional Journalists</a> has chosen Dorothy Bland as recipient of the <a href="https://www.spj.org/a-teaching.asp">Distinguished Teaching in Journalism Award</a>. Bland is a professor at the <a href="https://journalism.unt.edu/">Mayborn School of Journalism at the University of North Texas</a>.<br> <br> Each year, SPJ honors an outstanding journalism educator and recognizes their exceptional teaching abilities and commitment to upholding the profession's highest standards. Bland won this year with detailed letters from faculty, professional colleagues and former students that acknowledged her diverse background and commitment to uplifting her students. <br> <br> Since joining the University of North Texas in 2013, Bland has been known as a leader amongst her colleagues, working tirelessly to improve the university and establishing programs to better students' learning experiences. With more than 25 years of professional media experience, she used her extensive background and knowledge to oversee the creation and launch of the university's online master's degree in digital communication analytics. She also initiated an undergraduate class in 2019 called “Covering Crisis, Trauma and Recovery” and started the Multimedia High School Workshop at UNT.<br> <br> "Over the last 15 years, she has taught more than 1,000 students at UNT and Florida A&M University. Her former students are working across the nation in a variety of markets as reporters, editors, broadcast anchors, multimedia journalists, social media specialists, account executives and other media-related jobs," said James E. Mueller, associate dean and professor at Mayborn School of Journalism. "Bland is an innovator in curricular design." <br> <br> To her students, Bland has been a committed mentor and professor to whom many credit their success. She is known for creating a trusting and welcoming environment that empowers students and helps them to pursue professional opportunities. Furthermore, she recognizes the best in her students and takes the time to assist them in applying for scholarships, fellowships and internships. <br> <br> "She is tireless in her efforts to serve, build and protect our industry by ensuring that she is identifying opportunities for her students and colleagues," said Cheryl Smith, publisher and editor for I Messenger Media. "Her students love working with her and she treats them with the utmost respect. She is always in pursuit of opportunities to help her students excel and she takes advantage of programs that could elevate students, educators and working journalists who may be seeking advanced degrees." <br> <br> University of North Texas student Priya Leal joined the Scripps Howard Foundation Emerging Journalists Program in the fall of 2021 and said Bland took her under her wing and helped her emerge from the internship with a variety of news skills that enabled her to reach her goals. <br> <br> "The program was a way for me to dive into the world of journalism and it would not have been possible without the help of Dorothy Bland," said Leal. "I truly do not think I would have been as successful if I did not have her help."<br> <br> Bland will be recognized at the Student Summit & Awards Program at <a href="https://mediafest22.org/">MediaFest22</a> in Washington, D.C. on Oct. 28. <br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> <br> Thu, 1 Sep 2022 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ partners with Indianapolis theatre company on play, ‘Lifespan of a Fact’ http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1891 CONTACT:<br> Lou Harry, SPJ Manager of Publications and Awards, 317-920-4786, <email address="lharry@spj.org">lharry@spj.org</a><br> Zoë Berg, SPJ Communications Specialist, 317-920-4785, <email address="zberg@spj.org">zberg@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — The <a href=https://www.spj.org/>Society of Professional Journalists</a> is partnering with <a href=https://www.americanlivestheatre.org/>American Lives Theatre</a>, an acclaimed professional theater company in Indianapolis, to present the local premiere of the play "Lifespan of a Fact," Thursday through Sept. 25 at the <a href=https://www.phoenixtheatre.org/>Phoenix Theatre Cultural Centre</a>. <br> <br> The play, which had a Broadway run, <a href=https://www.quillmag.com/2018/12/07/broadway-play-casts-spotlight-on-alternative-facts/>deals with a fact checker, a writer and an editor wrestling with issues of truth and journalistic integrity</a>. <br> <br> "When I got wind that American Lives Theatre would be staging 'Lifespan of a Fact,' I immediately thought there could be a win-win partnership with SPJ. The play doesn't just touch on issues of ethics and fact checking, it dives deep into them,” said Quill Editor/SPJ Manager of Publications and Awards Lou Harry. “While being entertaining, it is also the kind of play that sparks lively, important discussions. I have no doubt that will happen in the post-show session. I'm hoping many of our members take advantage of this opportunity to see the play during its limited run."<br> <br> On Saturday, SPJ will have a table in the lobby to answer questions before the show. After the performance, Harry and SPJ Director of Ethics and Diversity Rod Hicks will host an audience-participation discussion with the artists to discuss the <a href=https://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp>SPJ Code of Ethics</a> and issues raised in the play. <br> <br> “With so many people distrustful of the news, it’s always good for them to see that journalists consider issues of ethics and work through them,” said Hicks. “This occurs every day in newsrooms across the country. Journalists know that news consumers lose faith in their work if they don’t adhere to high ethical standards”<br> <br> SPJ members will receive a discount on tickets throughout the show’s run. Information on how to get the discount will be sent to members via SPJ’s weekly newsletter. <br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center> Tue, 30 Aug 2022 00:00:00 -0500 Nevada Public Radio, The Markup and Gizmodo, Al Jazeera English win New America Award http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1890 CONTACT:<br> Lou Harry, SPJ Manager of Publications and Awards, 317-920-4786, <email address="lharry@spj.org">lharry@spj.org</a> <br> Michelle Lagos, SPJ Communications Coordinator, 317-927-8000, <email address="@spj.org">mlagos@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – The <a href="https://www.spj.org">Society of Professional Journalists</a> is honored to announce the recipients of its <a href="https://www.spj.org/a-newamerica.asp">New America Awards</a>. This year, SPJ has introduced winners for audio, print/online and television categories — as well as an overall excellence award. <br> <br> This year’s New America division winners are:<br> • Audio winner – Nevada Public Radio for “A year and counting of COVID in Las Vegas: The overworked”<br> • Print/online winner – The Markup and Gizmodo for “Predication: Bias”<br> • Television winner – Al Jazeera English for “Buried truths: America’s Indigenous boarding schools”<br> <br> The overall excellence award winner is <a href="https://themarkup.org/prediction-bias/2021/12/02/crime-prediction-software-promised-to-be-free-of-biases-new-data-shows-it-perpetuates-them">The Markup and Gizmodo for “Predication: Bias”</a>.<br> <br> <a href="https://exitspringmountain.simplecast.com/episodes/a-year-and-counting-of-covid-in-las-vegas-the-overworked-VoK8HE_B">“A year and counting of COVID in Las Vegas: The overworked”</a> by Nevada Public Radio is the first in a three-part series about the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and its effects on Southern Nevada's Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. This series documented the death rates of nurses in the early stages of COVID-19 and found that while Filipino nurses made up 4% of nurses nationwide, they accounted for 33% of nurse deaths. <br> <br> <a href="https://www.aljazeera.com/program/fault-lines/2021/11/24/buried-truths-americas-indigenous-boarding-schools">“Buried truths: America’s Indigenous boarding schools”</a> by Al Jazeera English reports on the century-long U.S. policy to remove Indigenous children from their culture. In the government’s attempt to isolate and eliminate Indigenous societies, Indigenous children were stripped of their culture and prevented from speaking their languages in boarding schools, which allegedly abused many children. <br> <br> <a href="https://themarkup.org/show-your-work/2021/12/02/how-we-determined-crime-prediction-software-disproportionately-targeted-low-income-black-and-latino-neighborhoods">“Predication: Bias”</a> by The Markup and Gizmodo started over a decade ago as a project to find whether and why police treat people of color differently. While working at Gizmodo, Dhruv Mehrotra, an enterprising data journalist, built a search engine to explore police records for law enforcement agencies across the U.S. and found a page on the Los Angeles Police Department's public website that linked to the algorithm, PredPol.<br> <br> The news staff found that PredPol was instructing law enforcement agencies across the country to patrol Black, Latino and low-income neighborhoods more than rich and white areas. The software developers of PredPol knew the software was biased, as a study in 2018 by PredPol's co-founders said the software would disproportionately impact communities of color. <br> <br> The team dogged more than 40 law enforcement agencies by telephone and email, sent more than 140 public records requests and called hundreds of arrestees and spoke to defense attorneys and prosecutors to find more about the software, who was using it and who knew.<br> <br> "The level of data-driven investigative reporting is applauded for this project. Not only did this nimble newsroom find a pattern, they dove in using their own custom tools to dig more and develop correlations on policing and the bias that exists across too many sectors of society,” said the New America Award judges. “This was a large-scale and complex data investigation that spanned multiple agencies and millions of data points."<br> <br> The New America Award celebrates work focused on immigrant or ethnic communities. This year's recipients will be honored during the President's Installation Banquet at <a href="https://mediafest22.org/">MediaFest22</a> in Washington, D.C., Oct. 29. Read more about the New America Award, including <a href="https://www.spj.org/a-newamerica-honorees.asp">past recipients.</a><br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> Mon, 29 Aug 2022 00:00:00 -0500 Region 11 Mark of Excellence Awards winners announced http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1889 CONTACT:<br> Lou Harry, SPJ Manager of Publications and Awards, 317-920-4786, <email address="lharry@spj.org">lharry@spj.org</a><br> Zoë Berg, SPJ Communications Specialist, 317-920-4785, <email address="zberg@spj.org">zberg@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — The <a href=https://www.spj.org/index.asp>Society of Professional Journalists</a> recognizes the best collegiate journalism in Region 11 with <a href=https://www.spj.org/a-moe.asp>2021 Mark of Excellence Awards</a> winners.<br> <br> SPJ’s <a href=https://www.spj.org/region11.asp>Region 11</a> comprises Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada and Mariana Islands. First-place winners competed at the national level among other regional MOE winners from the 12 SPJ regions.<br> <br> <a href=https://www.spj.org/news.asp?ref=1881>National winners</a> were notified in the late spring and will be recognized at the <a href=https://www.spj.org/convention.asp>MediaFest22</a> convention in Washington, D.C., Oct. 27-30.<br> <br> MOE Awards entries are judged by professionals with at least three years of journalism experience. Judges were directed to choose entries they felt were among the best in student journalism. If no entry rose to the level of excellence, no award was given. Any category not listed has no winner.<br> <br> School divisions are based on student enrollment, including both graduate and undergraduate: Large schools have at least 10,000 students and small schools have 9,999 or fewer students.<br> <br> The list below details all Region 11 winners. If you have any questions regarding the MOE Awards, contact SPJ Manager of Publications and Awards Lou Harry by email or 317-920-4786.<br> <br> This list reflects the spelling and titles submitted in the award entries. New MOE categories were added this year for cultural criticism, arts/fashion journalism and food/restaurant journalism.<br> <br> <b>Print/Online</b><br> <br> Breaking News Reporting (Large)<br> Winner: House votes on removing, possibly impeaching Trump after mob attacks — by Sarah Oven, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> Finalist: As cops testify on Capitol attacks, GOP lawmakers blast ‘sham’ inquiry — by Alyssa Marksz, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> <br> Breaking News Reporting (Small)<br> Winner: Outcome of campus safety hearing prompts criticism from students and faculty — by Carolyn Kuimelis, Santa Clara University<br> Finalist: University will hold in-person commencement event in June — by Jaydelle Herbert, University of La Verne<br> <br> General News Reporting (Large)<br> Winner: Mine spill of 2014 continues to devastate Sonoran communities years later — by Clara Migoya, University of Arizona<br> Finalist: Korematsu Day rises from injustices of Japanese internment camps during WWII — by Ethan Kispert, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> Finalist: Arizona’s aerospace and defense industry has close financial ties to Israeli security — by Emma Ascott, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> <br> General News Reporting (Small)<br> Winner: Pursuing social justice — by The Santa Clara staff, Santa Clara University<br> Finalist: A Journey from ruin to resilience: The Malibu community reflects on Woolsey — by Makena Huey, Pepperdine University<br> Finalist: Anti-Abortion freedom wall display creates discourse — by Samantha Torre, Pepperdine University<br> <br> In-Depth Reporting (Large)<br> Winner: Little victims everywhere — by Cronkite News/Arizona PBS investigative team, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> Finalist: Investigation of theater arts employee for lewd behavior, harassment — by James Domizio, Alex Fuller, Cass Stewart and Emma Malloy, Santa Rosa Junior College<br> Finalist: Neighbors hope for relief from crematorium smoke as COVID-19 deaths decrease — by Kevin Pirehpour, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> <br> In-Depth Reporting (Small)<br> Winner: Sexual Violence at SCU — by The Santa Clara staff, Santa Clara University<br> <br> Feature Writing <br> Winner: 5 transgender military veterans discuss abuses, how political changes can alter lives — by Rachel Stapholz, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> Finalist: Tree shortage leaves East Palo susceptible to climate change — by Jennah Haque, Stanford University<br> Finalist: The $2 drug that millions of patients aren't being told about — by Kat Kennedy, University of Arizona<br> <br> Sports Writing<br> Winner: Last Chance Yuma: Thriving Arizona Western soccer program bonds a community — by Amiliano Fragoso, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> Finalist: Rez ball rebirth in Chinle: Navajo Nation rebounds as pandemic takes its toll — by Gabrielle Ducharme, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> Finalist: Talented alum embarks on a new adventure — by Xiomara Villarreal-Gerardo, Southwestern College<br> <br> Editorial Writing <br> Winner: Opinion: Pepp changes its words but can’t change its history — by Alec Matulka, Pepperdine University<br> Finalist: Unsigned editorials — by The Southwestern College Sun staff, Southwestern College<br> <br> General Column Writing<br> Winner: Haley Tenore columns — by Haley Tenore, Arizona State University<br> <br> Corbin Gwaltney Award for Best All-Around Student Newspaper (Large)<br> Winner: The Southwestern College Sun — by Staff, Southwestern College<br> Finalist: The Collegian — by Staff, Fresno State<br> Finalist: The Corsair — by Staff, Santa Monica College<br> <br> Corbin Gwaltney Award for Best All-Around Student Newspaper (Small)<br> Winner: The Graphic — by Staff, Pepperdine University<br> Finalist: Campus Times — by Staff, University of La Verne<br> <br> Best Student Magazine<br> Winner: Currents Magazine — by staff, Pepperdine University<br> Finalist: Etc. Magazine — by staff, City College of San Francisco<br> <br> Best Affiliated Web Site <br> Winner: The Graphic — by staff, Pepperdine University<br> Finalist: USC Dimelo — by staff, University of Southern California<br> <br> Best Independent Online Student Publication <br> Winner: The State Press — by staff, Arizona State University<br> Finalist: The Los Angeles Loyolan — by staff, Loyola Marymount University<br> Finalist: Our America — by staff, California State University Fullerton<br> <br> <b>Art/Graphics/Multimedia</b><br> <br> Breaking News Photography<br> Winner: Officer at Rittenhouse protest — by Jason White, Arizona State University<br> Finalist: Caldor Fire on critical night — by Aryk Copley, Santa Rosa Junior College<br> Finalist: BLM and WLM face off in Huntington Beach California — by Jonathan Putman, Santa Monica College<br> <br> General News Photography<br> Winner: Jack Harlow at Inferno Fest — by Drake Presto, Arizona State University<br> Finalist: Pepperdine welcomes incoming Class of 2025 to Malibu — by Ali Levens, Pepperdine University<br> Finalist: COVID wince — by Luis Flores, Los Angeles valley College<br> <br> Feature Photography<br> Winner: The drag show must go on: 4Some Revue adjusts to performing during pandemic — by Alina Nelson, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> Finalist: Bearial: Stanford's big game traditions — by Ula Lucas, Stanford University<br> Finalist: Michael Little Crow portrait — by Alex Gould, Arizona State University<br> <br> Photo Illustration<br> Winner: Altar de Femicidio — by Ji Ho Kim and Xiomara Villarreal-Gerardo, Southwestern College<br> Finalist: Are all opinions equal? — by Haley Hoidal, Pepperdine University<br> Finalist: Rams’ Reign continues with strong performances versus Las Positas and Santa Rosa — by Bob Kinoshita; Erin Blackwell, City College of San Francisco<br> <br> Sports Photography<br> Winner: Men’s soccer: CSUN extends losing streak to 7 games — by Chris Torres, California State University, Northridge<br> Finalist: Pregame scream — by Jonathan Putman, Santa Monica College<br> Finalist: Men’s Basketball triumphs over Idaho State in home opener — by Dane Bruhahn, Pepperdine University<br> <br> Editorial Cartooning <br> Winner: Cartoons — by Reed Steiner, Arizona State University<br> <br> Best Use of Multimedia<br> Winner: A community’s response: Reflections from the White Mountain Apache Tribe a year into the COVID-19 pandemic — by Alberton Mariani, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> Finalist: As Americans roll up their sleeves, here’s how three COVID-19 vaccines compare — by Sarandon Raboin, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> Finalist: National City entrepreneurs struggle to keep business afloat during COVID-19 pandemic (with podcast) — by Katia Pechenkina, Vicky Pineda, Gabriel Schneider, and Susana Serrano, San Diego City College<br> <br> Broadcast/Online News Videography<br> Winner: Navajo Nation clings for survival — by Brenda Elizondo, California State University Fullerton<br> Finalist: CPP opens mass COVID-19 vaccination site — by Cathy Myers, Lauren Muttram, Cal Poly Pomona<br> <br> Broadcast/Online Feature Videography<br> Winner: Koshio artist hike — by Sarandon Raboin, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> Finalist: Delivering Hope: How those who’ve been there are fighting homelessness — by Miles Green and Kevin Hurley, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> Finalist: The Academy Museum: Hollywood's newest star — by Aja Marshal, Santa Monica College<br> <br> Broadcast/Online Sports Videography<br> Winner: Rush: Jackson He — by Drake Presto, Arizona State University<br> Finalist: Paradise Valley Community College softball player — by Zachary Keenan, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> <br> Data Visualization<br> Winner: Feminine hygiene products map — by Andrew Onodera, Arizona State University<br> <br> <b>Audio</b><br> <br> Radio News Reporting<br> Winner: Why rideshare users in Arizona continue to see long waits and high prices — by Tyler Budge, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> Finalist: Apache make emotional appeal to court to halt proposed copper mine — by Zach Keenan, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> <br> Radio Feature<br> Winner: Arizona’s RUF Nation puts Indigenous roots on display through combat athletics — by David Montoya, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> <br> Radio In-Depth Reporting<br> Winner: Pinal County farmer struggles to grow crops with less water — by Emma VandenEinde, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> <br> Radio Sports Reporting<br> Winner: ‘You’re it!’ Local parkour athlete plays, commentates competitive tag — by Henry Greenstein, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> Finalist: From Lil Wayne to Lauryn Hill, playlist helps Mercury find their vibe — by Kenneth Manoj, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> <br> Podcast<br> Winner: Chronic catastrophe — by Lauren A. Spates, Maritza Camacho, Nicholas Vides and Rebecca Bell, Santa Rosa Junior College<br> Finalist: The Listening Machine — by Jakob McWhinney, San Diego City College<br> Finalist: The New Normal, Part One — by Sonya Sheptunov, Arizona State University<br> <br> <b>Broadcast</b><br> <br> Television General News Reporting<br> Winner: Water pipeline — by Katelyn Keenehan, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism & Mass Comm<br> Finalist: Farmer discrimination — by Lauren Quinlan, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism & Mass Comm<br> Finalist: Covid campus parties — by Jackie Gold, Chapman University<br> <br> Television Feature Reporting <br> Winner: A COVID-inspired career change: From concrete to succulents — by Cassie Esparza, University of Southern California <br> Finalist: Indigenous oral history — by Faith Abercrombie, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism & Mass Comm<br> Finalist: FilmBar saved — by Tyler Manion, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism & Mass Comm<br> <br> Television In-Depth Reporting <br> Winner: White Mountain Apache Covid — by McKenzie Allen-Charmley, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism & Mass Comm<br> Finalist: Salt River horses — by Megan Newsham, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism & Mass Comm<br> Finalist: Team coverage: Alec Baldwin set shooting — by Barbara Fox, Luca Evans, Chapman University<br> <br> Best All-Around Television Newscast<br> Winner: Cronkite News/Arizona PBS — by staff, Arizona State University<br> <br> Best All-Around Television News Magazine<br> Winner: Our America — by staff, California State University Fullerton<br> Finalist: Chapman News — by staff, Chapman University<br> Finalist: Chapman News — by staff, Chapman University<br> <br> <b>All Platforms</b><br> <br> Immersion Journalism<br> Winner: Barnstorming through barriers: The Katherine Cheung story — by JOVRNALISM staff, USC Annenberg<br> Finalist: Who we are: More than A survivor — by JOVRNALISM staff, USC Annenberg<br> <br> Cultural Criticism <br> Winner: Columns — by Joshua Hernandez, Cal Poly Pomona<br> <br> Arts/Fashion Journalism <br> Winner: Students share cheap and trendy Halloween costume ideas — by Lydia duPerier, Pepperdine University<br> Finalist: Interview with Student Academy Award winners — by Luca Evans and Kiana Favela, Chapman University<br> <br> Food/Restaurant Journalism <br> Winner: Lamb to the slaughter — by Ike Allen, University of Southern California<br> Finalist: Revitalizing Indigenous foodways — by Sarah Wolfson, University of Southern California<br> Finalist: Fighting Koreatown's dining decline — by Maya Zeleski, University of Southern California<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center> Wed, 24 Aug 2022 00:00:00 -0500 Woodward and Bernstein to speak at MediaFest22 http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1888 CONTACT:<br> Karyn Nishimura Sneath, SPJ Director of Education, 317-920-4791, <email address="ksneath@spj.org">ksneath@spj.org</a><br> Zoë Berg, SPJ Communications Specialist, 317-920-4785, <email address="zberg@spj.org">zberg@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — On the 50th anniversary of the Watergate break-in, join legendary reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein at <a href=https://mediafest22.org/>MediaFest22</a> as they discuss the famous investigative story, how they broke it and its lasting impact on journalism. <br> <br> MediaFest22 is the <a href=https://www.spj.org/index.asp>Society of Professional Journalists</a> annual convention in partnership with the <a href=https://studentpress.org/acp/>Associated Collegiate Press</a> and <a href=http://www.collegemedia.org/>College Media Association</a>. It will be held in Washington, D.C., Oct. 27-30.<br> <br> “What a privilege and an honor it will be to welcome two of America’s greatest investigative journalists to our convention,” said SPJ President-elect Claire Regan, who will be moderating the discussion. “I look forward to hearing their perspectives on Watergate 50 years after the historic break-in, on the current political climate and on the state of the journalism industry. They are sure to inspire college students, working journalists and everyone else who shares a passion for our profession.”<br> <br> Few journalists have impacted American history like Woodward and Bernstein. In 1973, they were awarded the Pulitzer Prize for their Watergate coverage at The Washington Post, leading to the resignation of President Richard Nixon and setting new standards for investigative journalism. The pair went on to write two classic bestsellers —&#8239;“All the President’s Men”&#8239;(also a movie starring Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman) and “The Final Days,” chronicling the end of the Nixon presidency. <br> <br> <b>Bob Woodward</b> is an associate editor of The Washington Post, where he has worked for 50 years. He has shared in two Pulitzer Prizes — first in 1973 for the coverage of the Watergate scandal and second in 2002 as the lead reporter for coverage of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. He has authored or co-authored 21 books, all national bestsellers. The last three on the Trump presidency: “Fear” (2018), “Rage” (2020) and “Peril” (2021) all were No. 1 New York Times bestsellers. Another 12 of his books have been New York Times No. 1 bestsellers. <br> <br> <b>Carl Bernstein</b> is a prolific author, writing about national and international affairs for half a century in books, reporting and commentary that has revealed the hidden workings of government and politics around the world. His magazine articles have appeared in Time, USA Today, Rolling Stone and The New Republic. From 1999-2001, Bernstein served as editor and executive vice president of Voter.com, a pioneering website that Forbes named the best political site on the internet. He has worked as Washington bureau chief and correspondent for ABC News; and, while at the Washington Post, was also a part-time rock critic.<br> <br> For more than 45 years, Woodward and Bernstein’s collective works have focused on the enduring themes of Watergate: secret government, abuses of power and the role of the press. Now they will join on the speaking stage to point out parallels from our past and provide unparalleled insights for our future — pulling back the curtain on Washington as only Woodward and Bernstein can.<br> <br> They will speak at the keynote address, moderated by Regan, on Oct. 28, the second day of the convention. <a href=https://www.spj.org/convention-register.asp>Registration</a> for MediaFest22 is open. <a href=https://www.spj.org/convention-register.asp>View rates</a> and keep an eye on the <a href=https://www.spj.org/convention-schedule.asp>schedule</a> as more sessions will be announced in the coming weeks.<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center> Tue, 23 Aug 2022 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ Foundation awards grants to NFIC, NAJA and other SPJ programs http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1887 CONTACT:<br> Matt Morris, SPJ Development Officer, 317-920-4784, <email address="mmorris@spj.org’<mmorris@spj.org">mmorris@spj.org</a><br> Zoë Berg, SPJ Communications Specialist, 317-920-4785, <email address="zberg@spj.org’>zberg@spj.org">zberg@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — The <a href=https://www.nfoic.org/>National Freedom of Information Coalition</a> and the <a href=https://najanewsroom.com/>Native American Journalists Association</a> are among five organizations receiving grants from the <a href=https://www.spj.org/foundation.asp>Society of Professional Journalists Foundation</a>. Grantees are receiving nearly $76,000 in total funding.<br> <br> The Foundation is also providing funding to this summer’s <a href=https://www.pcli.org/2022/03/01/spj-northeast-launches-high-school-journalism-institute/>SPJ Region 1 Northeast High School Journalism Institute</a>; <a href=https://www.spj.org/fla.asp>SPJ’s Future Leaders Academy</a>; and <a href=https://mediafest22.org/>MediaFest22</a>, SPJ’s annual convention.<br> <br> “Finding funding is always a concern, so the SPJ Foundation is pleased to support these creative and educational programs,” said SPJ Foundation President Irwin Gratz. “NFOIC and NAJA’s projects will help foster much needed diversity in the journalism industry. We are proud to be on the ground floor of helping train the future leaders in journalism and continuing to provide support for those furthering their skills and career.”<br> <br> <a href=https://www.nfoic.org/foi-bootcamp-for-journalists-of-color/>NFOIC’s Freedom of Information Bootcamp for Journalists of Color</a> trains participants to acquire and analyze government documents and data. Along with enhancing general skills, participants team up with coalition leaders and others for help to access government information. The program connects participants with SPJ chapters. Participants engage in FOI training including sessions at journalism conferences and with organizations such as the <a href=https://www.rcfp.org/>Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press</a>. <br> <br> The program provides networking opportunities with other journalists of color nationwide through the <a href=https://www.nfoic.org/foi-center/foi-summits/>NFOIC Summit</a> and SPJ’s convention. The initiative seeks to bolster diversity and inclusion among FOI subject experts.<br> <br> A grant to NAJA will fund completion of the <b>Indigenous Media Landscape Project</b>. In partnership with the <a href=https://oklahomamediacenter.com/>Oklahoma Media Center</a>, the project analyzes pre- and post- “Promised Land” coverage, measuring the impact of NAJA newsroom trainings to determine whether Indigenous coverage in mainstream media has improved. <br> <br> NAJA will train more than 25 journalists on ethical coverage of Indigenous issues. The program will help reporters by providing a context for covering tribal sovereignty issues in Oklahoma, which is home to 39 federally recognized tribes. <br> <br> The <a href=https://www.pcli.org/2022/03/01/spj-northeast-launches-high-school-journalism-institute/>SPJ Region 1 Northeast High School Journalism Institute</a> at Roger Williams University in Bristol, Rhode Island, offers students training in field reporting. Students participate in lectures and workshops about SPJ as well as coursework in newswriting, reporting, editing, photography, videography and digital media. Working in teams, students report on the environment, science, economy and infrastructure. The teams generate narrative, photos, videos and audio for each story to be published on a website created for the program. They can then access the website for work samples to include on their resume and in portfolio for future jobs. <br> <br> Funding for <a href=https://www.spj.org/fla.asp>SPJ’s Future Leaders Academy</a>, held May 20-21 in Indianapolis, supported the professional development program focusing on building leadership skills and empowering the next generation of SPJ and newsroom leaders. The academy is an outgrowth of the Ted Scripps Leadership Institute, whose graduates helped shape today’s SPJ.<br> <br> The program engaged emerging and diverse journalists and offered networking opportunities and further education beyond the initial program. Participants engaged in group decision-making, learned SPJ history and discussed visionary leadership and the importance of foresight and strategic planning.<br> <br> A grant will support <a href=https://mediafest22.org/>MediaFest22</a>, SPJ’s annual convention with the <a href=http://www.collegemedia.org/>College Media Association</a> and <a href=https://studentpress.org/acp/>Associated Collegiate Press</a> as partners. MediaFest22, Oct. 27-30 in Washington, D.C., will offer training via more than 50 professional development programs geared to the organization’s mission and the needs of today’s journalists. <br> <br> <a href=https://www.spj.org/foundation-grants.asp>SPJ Foundation grants</a> primarily support SPJ and provide support to organizations and causes that further the Society’s mission. Grant requests are first reviewed by the Foundation Grants and Awards Committee and then their recommendations are sent to the SPJ Foundation Board of Directors for review and selection.<br> <br> View <a href=https://www.spj.org/foundation-grants.asp>previous recipients</a>.<br> <br> <i>The Society of Professional Journalists Foundation is a public foundation dedicated to ensuring that those who carry on the tradition of a free press are prepared for the challenge. The SPJ Foundation supports educational and professional needs of journalists and journalism students. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href=https://www.spj.org/donate.asp>Give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.<br> <br> SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center> Tue, 16 Aug 2022 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ mourns death of Fellow of the Society Jerry Ceppos http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1886 CONTACT:<br> Rebecca Aguilar, SPJ National President, 317-361-4134, <email address="rebeccaaguilar50@gmail.com">rebeccaaguilar50@gmail.com</a> <br> Zoë Berg, SPJ Communications Specialist, 317-920-4785, <email address="zberg@spj.org'>zberg@spj.org">zberg@spj.org</a> <br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — The <a href="https://www.spj.org">Society of Professional Journalists</a> is mourning a Fellow of the Society and longtime journalist today as it grieves the passing of Jerry Ceppos. <br> <br> “SPJ will remember Jerry as a true leader in journalism,” said SPJ National President Rebecca Aguilar. “Whether in the newsroom or in the classroom, Jerry inspired other journalists to have the courage and compassion to be committed truth seekers in our profession.” <br> <br> In 2016, Ceppos was <a href="https://www.spj.org/news.asp?ref=1441">named a Fellow of the Society</a>, SPJ’s highest professional honor, for being “an advocate for the industry, from educating students on journalism ethics to fighting for diversity in the newsroom.” He received the <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp">SPJ Ethics in Journalism Award</a> in 1997, the first year it was awarded.<br> <br> Ceppos’ journalism career <a href="https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_rouge/news/education/article_5a346b80-1059-11ed-a876-8fe7cf4d531b.html">spanned over 50 years</a>, beginning at the Rochester Democrat in the early 1970s. He then served as an editor at the Miami Herald before moving to the San Jose Mercury News where he spent time as the managing editor, executive editor and senior vice president. During his time at the Mercury News, the newspaper won two Pulitzer Prizes. He then became the top news officer of Knight Ridder, former owner of 32 daily papers, making it for a time the second largest publisher of newspapers in the United States.<br> <br> Devoted to journalism education, Ceppos <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/jerry-ceppos-distinguished-editor-educator-dies-at-age-75/2022/08/01/dd899ed8-114e-11ed-8482-06c1c84ce8f2_story.html">served as the dean at two journalism schools</a> — Manship School of Mass Communication at Louisiana State University and Reynolds School of Journalism at the University of Nevada, Reno. <br> <br> Ceppos <a href="https://www.mercurynews.com/2022/07/30/jerry-ceppos-former-top-editor-of-the-mercury-news-dead-at-75/">was an outstanding journalist and editor</a> who increased newsroom diversity by creating new beats and reporting teams to cover previously overlooked populations. He remained committed to local journalism, even as a dean. While at LSU he started a news service to help fill a void left by declining mainstream news outlets, assigning student journalists to cover state government and undertake investigative projects.<br> <br> Our thoughts are with his family, friends, colleagues and former students. <br> <br> Ceppos will be buried in Miami during a private family service. A public celebration of his life will be held later. <br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> <br> Mon, 1 Aug 2022 00:00:00 -0500 MediaFest22 opening keynote to feature Denetclaw, Min Kim, Summers http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1885 CONTACT:<br> Karyn Nishimura Sneath, SPJ Director of Education, 317-920-4791, <email address="ksneath@spj.org">ksneath@spj.org</a><br> Zoë Berg, SPJ Communications Specialist, 317-920-4785, <email address="zberg@spj.org">zberg@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — The opening keynote presentation for <a href=https://mediafest22.org/>MediaFest22</a> will feature Pauly Denetclaw, Indian Country Today political correspondent, Seung Min Kim, Associated Press White House reporter and Juana Summers, NPR’s “All Things Considered” co-host. <br> <br> MediaFest22 is the <a href=https://www.spj.org/index.asp>Society of Professional Journalists</a> annual convention in partnership with the <a href=https://studentpress.org/acp/>Associated Collegiate Press</a> and <a href=http://www.collegemedia.org/>College Media Association</a>. It will be held in Washington, D.C., Oct. 27-30. <br> <br> The opening keynote, titled “Perspectives on Journalism's Future,” will allow each speaker to individually give a 10-minute talk on how journalism can better serve the communities they cover. They will then join together for a moderated panel discussion to dig deeper on themes raised with an opportunity for a Q&A. <br> <br> These three journalists have considerable experience and will bring diverse perspectives to the discussion on journalism’s future. <br> <br> <b>Pauly Denetclaw</b>, a citizen of the Navajo Nation, is Haltsooí (Meadow People) born for Kinyaa’áanii (Towering House People). An award-winning reporter based in Washington, D.C., she has worked for the Navajo Times and Texas Observer covering Indigenous communities, and her radio pieces have aired on KYAT, National Native News, NPR’s Latino USA and Texas Public Radio. She is a board member of the Native American Journalist Association. <br> <br> <b>Seung Min Kim</b> is a White House reporter for The Associated Press, specializing in the Biden administration's relationship with Capitol Hill. Before joining the AP in July 2022, she covered the White House for The Washington Post and Congress for Politico. She is a board member of the Washington Press Club Foundation and a member of the Asian American Journalists Association.<br> <br> <b>Juana Summers</b> is a co-host of NPR's “All Things Considered,” alongside Ailsa Chang, Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly. She joined All Things Considered in June 2022. Summers previously spent more than a decade covering national politics, most recently as NPR's political correspondent covering race, justice and politics. She covered the 2012, 2016 and 2020 presidential elections, and has also previously covered Congress for NPR. Her work has appeared in a variety of publications across multiple platforms, including Politico, CNN, Mashable and The Associated Press.<br> <br> <a href=https://www.spj.org/convention-register.asp>Registration</a> for MediaFest22 is open. <a href=https://www.spj.org/convention-register.asp>View rates</a> and keep an eye on the <a href=https://www.spj.org/convention-schedule.asp>schedule</a> as more sessions will be announced in the coming weeks. <br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center> Mon, 25 Jul 2022 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ calls Rappler shut down 'wrong on many fronts' http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1884 Contact:<br> <br> Rebecca Aguilar, SPJ National President, 317-361-4134, <email address="rebeccaaguilar50@gmail.com">rebeccaaguilar50@gmail.com</a><br> Jennifer Royer, SPJ Senior Director of Communications, 317-361-4134, <email address="jroyer@spj.org">jroyer@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – The <a href="https://www.spj.org">Society of Professional Journalists</a> fights for freedom of the press around the world, and the organization finds <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/jun/29/philippines-orders-news-site-rappler-to-close-as-nobel-prize-winner-maria-ressa-vows-to-fight-on">the Philippine government's decision to order the closure of the acclaimed news site</a>, Rappler, wrong on many fronts. <br> <br> In a message posted to its readers Wednesday, <a href="https://www.rappler.com/nation/securities-exchange-commission-issues-revocation-order-june-28-2022/">Rappler announced that the Philippine Securities and Exchange Commission revoked its license to operate</a>. “What this means for you, and for us, is that the Commission is ordering us to close shop, to cease telling you stories, to stop speaking truth to power, and to let go of everything that we have built – and created – with you since 2012.”<br> <br> Rappler was founded and run by Maria Ressa, 2018 Time Magazine Person of the Year, <a href="https://www.spj.org/news.asp?ref=1676">2019 SPJ Fellow of the Society</a> and 2021 Nobel Peace Prize winner. Rappler’s consistent and objective reporting about the outgoing Duterte government has caused it to face numerous legal challenges to its existence. Some charges against Ressa and Rappler were dismissed while others are still under appeal. <br> <br> In its statement, Rappler said it would contest the decision.<br> <br> Dan Kubiske, co-chair of the <a href="https://www.spj.org/ij.asp">SPJ International Community</a> said the move by the Philippine government, while not unexpected, was still a surprise.<br> <br> “For about a decade the Duterte government has been trying to shut down The Rappler,” said Kubiske. “And now, on its last day in power, it has succeeded in silencing a major news organization that is the definition of independent and honest journalism in the Philippines.”<br> <br> The Duterte government leaves power June 30 when Ferdinand “Bong Bong” Marcos takes over the office of the presidency.<br> <br> “Marcos has shown the same contempt for the independent press in the Philippines, and especially The Rappler, as Duterte,” said Kubiske. “It just strikes us odd that on the last day of his administration, Duterte got his wish of closing Rappler.”<br> <br> SPJ National President Rebecca Aguilar expressed her concern for the safety and well-being of Ressa and her staff at Rappler. She added SPJ will continue to monitor the situation and provide whatever help the Society can offer.<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> Wed, 29 Jun 2022 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ to host 23 student journalists for 2022 Student Leadership Institute http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1883 CONTACT:<br> Karyn Nishimura Sneath, SPJ Director of Education, 317-920-4791, <email address="ksneath@spj.org">ksneath@spj.org</a><br> Michelle Lagos, SPJ Communications Coordinator, 317-361-4134, <email address="mlagos@spj.org">mlagos@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – The <a href=https://www.spj.org>Society of Professional Journalists</a> is bringing together 23 students to participate in its second <a href=https://www.spj.org/sli.asp>Student Leadership Institute</a>. <br> <br> The weekend institute is designed for a small cohort of journalism students to learn skills needed to be successful in the evolving, complex and diverse field from professional facilitators. <br> <br> SLI will provide participants with a solid foundation on self-awareness and the skills necessary for leading and contributing to a team. Students will also learn to understand and apply the <a href=https://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp>SPJ Code of Ethics</a>, making them more credible and ethical-based journalists. <br> <br> The institute, created with support from the Scripps Howard Foundation, is set for July 8-10 at Waycross Conference Center in Morgantown, Indiana. Participants were chosen by a selection committee earlier this year. <br> <br> "SPJ was founded as a student organization and developing the next generation of leaders in journalism is one of our hallmarks,” said John Shertzer, SPJ executive director. “These students should expect to be challenged by compelling conversations, skill-building exercises and practical case studies that will teach them the complexities of leading in this ever-changing industry."<br> <br> The interactive nature of the program in a very casual location will allow for students to connect and network with students from around the country and successful industry leaders. <br> <br> The students will also be given an opportunity to strengthen their skills at <a href="https://mediafest22.org">MediaFest 2022</a>, the SPJ national convention, Oct. 27-30 in Washington, D.C. There will also be mentoring opportunities for early-career professionals. <br> <br> The selected group of students represent universities from across the country and work for student and professional news organizations. The exceptional students participating in SLI are:<br> <br> — <B>Camden Alexander</B>, University of Utah, opinion writer for The Daily Utah Chronicle, voting member on the university’s student media council and supreme court justice for the university’s student government. <br> — <B>Jacee Caldwell</B>, Utah State University, news content manager for the Utah Statesman, member of USUSA Dancers Club and College of Humanities and Social Sciences Council. <br> — <B>Olivia Capriotti</B>, University of Massachusetts Amherst, reporter for The Daily Collegian and The Amherst Wire.<br> — <B>McKenna Christy</B>, Ohio University, associate editor at Backdrop Magazine and freshman liaison for the SPJ campus chapter. <br> — <B>Kylie Clifton</B>, Loyola Marymount University, former social justice intern and current social justice editor for the Los Angeles Loyolan. <br> — <B>Natalie Colby</B>, University of Utah, incoming student editor-in-chief for The Daily Utah Chronicle. <br> — <B>Carlene Coombs</B>, University of Utah, news writer for The Daily Utah Chronicle and a former copy editor and multimedia journalist for a student produced magazine at Brigham Young University-Hawaii. <br> — <B>Tess Crowley</B>, University of Michigan, co-managing photo editor of the Michigan Daily and a photographer on the digital photo and street style teams for SHEI Magazine. Owner of Tess Crowley Photo, where she photographs weddings, graduations, headshots and other events. <br> — <B>Alyssa Cruz</B>, Ohio University, staff reporter for The Post, an independent, student-run publication based in Athens, Ohio, and an executive board member for SPJ’s Ohio University chapter. <br> — <B>Alivia Hartpence</B>, Bowling Green State University, president for the university’s SPJ campus chapter. <br> — <B>Dani Heba</B>, City University of New York, sports editor of the university’s newspaper and president of SPJ’s CUNY chapter. <br> — <B>Elizabeth Karpen</B>, Barnard College of Columbia University, senior columnist and podcaster and former deputy sports editor, sports editor and managing editor for the Columbia Daily.<br> — <B>Simon J. Levien</B>, Harvard College, in-depth and longform reporter and the news executive and audience engagement editor for the Harvard Crimson. <br> — <B>Prinny Martinez</B>, Chapman University, lead producer for Chapman University’s broadcast journalism program, Chapman News. <br> — <B>Jakob McWhinney</B>, San Diego City College, operations manager of City Times Media and managing editor of the City Times website. <br> — <B>Claudia Morales</B>, Florida International University, member of SPJ and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ) and reporter for the South Florida Media Network. <br> — <B>Adryan Nash</B>, University of Maryland, historian for the Maryland Association of Black Journalists and undergraduate representative for the diversity, equity, and inclusion committee at the Philip Merrill College of Journalism.<br> — <B>Lauren Penington</B>, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, multimedia journalist for the Nebraska News Service and journalism peer mentor lead for the university’s College of Journalism and Mass Communications. <br> — <B>Liannys Y Polanco</B>, Florida International University, intern at Televisa Univision STEP program and staff member of the student-run newscast at South Florida Media Network.<br> — <B>Hailey Roy</B>, Southern Connecticut State University, secretary of the university’s SPJ campus chapter and the co-features editor at Crescent Magazine.<br> — <B>Kayleigh Silverstein</B>, University of Utah, assistant news editor at The Daily Utah Chronicle. <br> — <B>Rayna Song</B>, Northwestern University, arts & entertainment editor at The Daily Northwestern, editor-in-chief at Northwestern Business Review and associate editor at North by Northwestern Magazine. <br> — <B>Ngai Yeung</B>, University of Southern California, former editor of the university’s newspaper, data reporter covering Los Angeles and intern at Bloomberg News.<br> <br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> <br> Tue, 28 Jun 2022 00:00:00 -0500 Announcing the 2021 Sigma Delta Chi Awards, MOEy and Corbin Gwaltney winners http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1882 Contact:<br> Lou Harry, SPJ Manager of Publications and Awards, 317-920-4786, <email address="lharry@spj.org">lharry@spj.org</a> <br> Michelle Lagos, SPJ Communications Coordinator, 317-927-8000, <email address="mlagos@spj.org">mlagos@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – The <a href="https://www.spj.org">Society of Professional Journalists</a> is proud to recognize recipients of the <a href="https://www.spj.org/sdxa21.asp">2021 Sigma Delta Chi Awards</a>, honoring outstanding professional journalism produced last year. <br> <br> <a href="https://spj.org/sdxa21.asp">Winners were announced tonight</a> during a virtual awards ceremony hosted by ABC News Correspondent Stephanie Ramos. The video is archived on <a href="https://www.youtube.com/c/spjournalists/videos">SPJ’s YouTube channel</a>.<br> <br> Award winners were announced by George Bodarky, community partnerships and training editor at WNYC Public Radio and Robin Shannon, news director for WFUV Public Radio. SPJ National President Rebecca Aguilar and SPJ Foundation President Irwin Gratz announced the winners of the top student awards. <br> <br> Prominent veteran journalists, who served as SDX Awards judges, selected 74 official winners from 1,413 entries. Dozens of local and national news organizations from print, TV, radio and online received SDX Awards, including Bloomberg News, The New York Times, NBC, Los Angeles Times, CBS, ProPublica, Time, ABC, Univision, NPR, The Washington Post, Noticias Telemundo, KSLA News, The Kansas City Star, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Boston Globe, Univision, King 5 TV, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Searchlight New Mexico, WXYZ-TV and many more. <br> <br> “Challenges continue in finding ways to keep the critical and vital lifeline of local news sustainable,” Ramos said in her remarks. “We dealt with disinformation campaigns and efforts to restrict a free press while some tried to devalue the press. We fight to build greater public trust in media through our commitment to <a href="https://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp">SPJ’s Code of Ethics</a>, but much work remains. Needless to say, we’ve got many challenges in front of us, but tonight we pay tribute to those who gave us so much evidence of what journalism is doing well.”<br> <br> Sigma Delta Chi Awards categories include breaking news, investigative reporting, features, documentaries, editorials and photography and more. This year, new categories were added, including Spanish-language media, food and restaurant reporting, cultural criticism, environment and climate reporting and travel reporting. A second podcasting category was also added.<br> <br> In addition to the professional SDX awards, the announcement also celebrated student journalism. The MOEy best in show award recognizes the best student journalism in the country and is given to the top entry among all <a href="https://www.spj.org/news.asp?ref=1881">national Mark of Excellence award winners</a>.<br> <br> “We had over 3,000 [MOE] entries this year and recognized hundreds of winners at the regional level and dozens who won national honors for their categories. From all of these, we’ve identified the one that stood above the rest to honor with this year’s MOEy,” Gratz said. <br> <br> This year’s MOEy winner is the <a href="https://visualizing81.thenewshouse.com/">Visualizing 81</a> staff at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. “Their work on the impact highway planning has on communities of color inspired the judges to comment that this was a strong story, and the telling included fantastic use of interactive components, archival material and other multiplatform elements – even mini-podcasting and 360 technology,” Gratz said.<br> <br> This year also marked the first winners of the <a href="https://www.spj.org/news.asp?ref=1856">Corbin Gwaltney Awards for Best All-Around Student Newspapers</a>. The award is named after Corbin Gwaltney, founder of The Chronicle of Higher Education. He was a media innovator who built the Chronicle to be the most respected publication in higher education. There is one award in the large division (10,000+ students) and one in the small division (1-9,999 students). Each winner receives a $5,000 prize, provided by The Chronicle of Higher Education.<br> <br> This year’s large division winner is <a href="http://www.theswcsun.com/">The Southwestern College Sun</a> of Chula Vista, California. The staff’s work is eye-catching and immediately draws readers in, judges said. The small division winner is <a href="https://loyolamaroon.com/">The Maroon of Loyola University</a> in New Orleans, for its strong stories, captivating headlines and incredible graphics. <br> <a href="https://www.spj.org/spjhistory.asp">Sigma Delta Chi was created as a student organization in 1909</a> and eventually grew to become SPJ, the longest-serving and most broad-journalism organization in the United States. SPJ continues to honor its history by retaining the original Greek letters in the awards presented. <br> <br> “Improving, celebrating and protecting journalism are key to SPJ,” Aguilar said. “We are champions for journalists, fighters for the First Amendment, stewards of ethical journalism and producers of journalism’s future. We advocate for journalists across the country who have remained dedicated to covering their communities every single day.”<br> <br> <b>All SDX winners are listed and have their work displayed <a href="https://www.spj.org/sdxa21.asp">on the SPJ website</a>.</b> <br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <i>The SPJ Foundation is a public foundation dedicated to ensuring that those who carry on the tradition of a free press are prepared for the challenge. The SPJ Foundation supports educational and professional needs of journalists and journalism students. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">Give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center> Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ announces 2021 Mark of Excellence National Winners http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1881 CONTACT:<br> Lou Harry, SPJ Manager of Publications and Awards, 317-920-4786, <email address="lharry@spj.org">lharry@spj.org</a><br> Michelle Lagos, SPJ Communications Coordinator, 317-927-8000, <email address="mlagos@spj.org">mlagos@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – The <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp">Society of Professional Journalists</a> is pleased to announce the national winners of the <a href=https://www.spj.org/a-moe.asp>2021 Mark of Excellence Awards</a>, recognizing collegiate work published or broadcast during 2021.<br> <br> The awards honor the best in student journalism. As such, judges were directed to choose only those entries which they felt were outstanding work worthy of a national honor. If the judges determined that none of the entries rose to the level of excellence, no award was given. Any category not listed has no winner.<br> <br> School divisions are based on student enrollment, which includes both graduate and undergraduate enrollment. Schools with more than 10,000 students are designated as large schools.<br> <br> National Mark of Excellence Awards judges can choose up to one national winner in each category and two national finalists (runners-up).<br> <br> Winners and finalists were previously recognized by receiving first-place in one of SPJ’s 12 regional competitions. The results of those competitions can be found in the <a href=https://www.spj.org/spjnewsa.asp> April 2022 SPJ News archive</a>. Each first-place regional winner advanced to the national competition.<br> <br> The MOEy best in show award and two <a href="https://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1856">Corbin Gwaltney Awards for Best All-Around Student Newspaper</a>, will be presented during the Sigma Delta Chi awards ceremony at 8 p.m. EDT Thursday. This event, which is once again virtual, may be viewed on <a href="https://www.youtube.com/c/spjournalists">SPJ's YouTube channel</a>. This is the first year for the Gwaltney Award, named for the co-founder of The Chronicle of Higher Education and founder of The Chronicle of Philanthropy.<br> <br> <B>Print/Online</B><br> <br> Breaking News Reporting (Large) 10,000+ Students<br> Winner: ‘Infamy is just as good as fame': UK student among crowd that mobbed Capitol building - by Natalie Parks, University of Kentucky <br> Finalist: Chauvin verdict inspires cheers, tears in downtown Minneapolis - by Mia Laube, Emily Haugen, Angeline Terry, University of St. Thomas<br> Finalist: Police served multiple warrants against FIJI and its members last year, court records show - by Caleb McCullough, University of Iowa<br> <br> Breaking News Reporting (Small) 1-9,999 Students<br> Winner: Massive power outage forces cancellation of classes and operations for a second day - by William Seekamp, Havi Stewart, Andrew Gotshall, Molly Lowney, University of Portland<br> <br> General News Reporting (Large) 10,000+ Students<br> Winner: Mine spill of 2014 continues to devastate Sonoran communities years later by - Clara Migoya, University of Arizona<br> <br> General News Reporting (Small) 1-9,999 Students <br> Winner: Deconstructing the police narrative - by Devin Yingling, Saint Joseph's University<br> Finalist: Black Student Coalition demands renaming of buildings named after enslaver, eugenicist - by The Collegian staff, University of Richmond<br> <br> In-Depth Reporting (Large) 10,000+ Students<br> Winner: Little victims everywhere - by investigative team, Arizona State University Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication<br> Finalist: US deems migrant seafood workers ‘essential’ but limits their COVID-19 protections - by Howard Center for Investigative Journalism and Capital News Service staff, University of Maryland<br> Finalist: Tulsa Race Massacre centennial - by The Oklahoma Daily staff, University of Oklahoma<br> <br> In-Depth Reporting (Small) 1-9,999 Students <br> Winner: Rohingya diaspora in the U.S. - by Imran Mohammad Fazal Hoque, Harry S. Truman College<br> Finalist: “This will change us”: Swarthmore considers upscale condo proposal in downtown - by Owen Mortner, Swarthmore College<br> Finalist: Marijuana charges hold past offenders back from future opportunities - by Artie Bennett, Jabez Berniard, Loyola University New Orleans<br> <br> Feature Writing (Large) 10,000+ Students<br> Winner: 24 hours with the Robert Anderson survivor protesters outside Schlissel’s house - by The Michigan Daily staff, University of Michigan - Ann Arbor<br> Finalist: Saving the planet one sniff at a time - by Jessica Gatzow, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee<br> Finalist: ‘Does god hate?’: 2SLGBTQ+ individuals seek affirmation, face religious condemnation - by Jillian Taylor, University of Oklahoma<br> <br> Feature Writing (Small) 1-9,999 Students <br> Winner: Ronald Crutcher reflects on the Westham Burying Ground - by Morgan Howland, University of Richmond<br> Finalist: A Crowd, a question and a typewriter - by Katia Faroun, Duquesne University<br> Finalist: Yuri Hernandez Osorio: Past and Present - by Will Mulligan, University of Portland<br> <br> Sports Writing (Large) 10,000+ Students<br> Winner: Last chance Yuma: Thriving Arizona Western soccer program bonds a community - by Amiliano Fragoso, Arizona State University Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication<br> Finalist: Former Florida women’s basketball players detail abuse under Coach Newbauer - by Zachary Huber, University of Florida<br> Finalist: Beauty vs. body: MSU's female student-athletes share body image struggles - by Jayna Bardahl, Michigan State University<br> <br> Sports Writing (Small) 1-9,999 Students <br> Winner: Before Jackie Robinson, there was Thomas Harding - by Drew Favakeh, Butler University<br> <br> Editorial Writing <br> Winner: Editorials - by Kentucky Kernal staff, University of Kentucky<br> Finalist: The Daily Free Press - by The Daily Free Press staff, Boston University<br> Finalist: Editorials - by The Emory Wheel editorial board, Emory University<br> <br> General Column Writing (Large) 10,000+ Students<br> Winner: Columns - by Zeniya Cooley, George Washington University<br> Finalist: Dear cable news, Leaving Afghanistan was the right choice; Free Steven Donziger; Taxing the rich - by Erik Uebelacker, DePaul University <br> Finalist: Title IX enforcement - by Claire Sullivan, Louisiana State University<br> <br> General Column Writing (Small) 1-9,999 Students <br> Winner: The Lehigh-LGBTQ+ experience - by Alana Bonfiglio, Lehigh University<br> <br> Best Student Magazine<br> Winner: The New Journal - by staff, Yale University<br> Finalist: Amendment Literary and Art Journal - by staff, Virginia Commonwealth University<br> Finalist: Ball Bearings Magazine - by staff, Ball State University<br> <br> Sports Column Writing <br> Winner: Columns - by Marquette Tribune editorial board, Marquette University <br> Finalist: Columns - by Michael Vestey, Miami University<br> Finalist: Sports columns - by Jackson Payne, Brigham Young University<br> <br> Best Use of Multimedia <br> Winner: Indignity in death - by Matt Cohen, Mallorey Daunhauer, Carson Terbush, Indiana University<br> Finalist: Visualizing 81 - by Visualizing 81 staff, Syracuse University<br> <br> Best Affiliated Website<br> Winner: The Harvard Crimson - by staff, Harvard College<br> Finalist: The Appalachian website - by staff, Appalachian State University<br> Finalist: northbynorthwestern.com - by staff, Northwestern University<br> <br> Best Independent Online Student Publication <br> Winner: The State Press - by staff, Arizona State University<br> Finalist: Upstate Unearthed - by staff, Syracuse University<br> Finalist: Native News - by staff, University of Montana<br> <br> Best All-Around Student Newspaper (Large) 10,000+ Students<br> Winner: The Southwestern College Sun - by staff, Southwestern College<br> Finalist: The Emory Wheel - by staff, Emory University<br> Finalist: The Argonaut - by staff, University of Idaho<br> <br> Best All-Around Student Newspaper (Small) 1-9,999 Students <br> Winner: The Maroon - by staff, Loyola University New Orleans<br> Finalist: The Ithacan - by staff, Ithaca College<br> Finalist: The Graphic - by staff, Pepperdine University<br> <br> <B>Art/Graphics</B> <br> <br> Breaking News Photography (Large) 10,000+ Students<br> Winner: Racial reckoning - by TJ Shaw, Syracuse University<br> Finalist: Walking out - by Dominick Sokotoff, University of Michigan<br> Finalist: Confrontation - by HG Biggs, University of Mississippi <br> <br> Breaking News Photography (Small) 1-9,999 Students <br> Winner: Drive by shooting near campus - by Lily Kaneshige, Gonzaga University<br> <br> General News Photography (Large) 10,000+ Students <br> Winner: Galbreath protest - by Antonio Ibarra, University of Montana<br> Finalist: Candlelight vigil - by Gavin Liddell, Syracuse University<br> Finalist: Indianapolis mourns FedEx shooting victims - by Alex Deryn, Indiana University<br> <br> General News Photography (Small) 1-9,999 Students <br> Winner: ‘Get it right the first time, that was a hate crime' - by Mitchell Shields, Saint Joseph's University<br> <br> Feature Photography (Large) 10,000+ Students <br> Winner: The hardest job she’ll ever love - by Allie Hendricks, Western Kentucky University<br> Finalist: Excited for the show, Tri Duong, Colorado State University <br> Finalist: The drag show must go on: 4Some Revue adjusts to performing during pandemic - by Alina Nelson, Arizona State University Walter Cronkite School of Journalism<br> <br> Feature Photography (Small) 1-9,999 Students <br> Winner: Beauty in business: Student-owned lash business offers affordable services to community - by Evan Bates, Appalachian State University<br> Finalist: It's snow time - by Mitchell Shields, Saint Joseph's University<br> Finalist: Pilgrimage Festival - by Hannah Cron, Lipscomb University<br> <br> Photo Illustration (Large) 10,000+ Students <br> Winner: Inside on the outside - by Jacob Moscovitch, University of Missouri, Missouri School of Journalism<br> <br> Sports Photography (Large) 10,000+ Students <br> Winner: Men’s soccer: CSUN extends losing streak to 7 games - by Chris Torres, California State University, Northridge<br> Finalist: Catch at third - by Trevor Cockburn, James Madison University<br> Finalist: Big 12 Championship tackle - by Josh Wilson, Baylor University<br> <br> Sports Photography (Small) 1-9,999 Students <br> Winner: Men's team celebrates with fans - by Ryan Reynolds, University of Portland<br> Finalist: Teams still on the field even as semester ends - by Alessandro Rivero, Mercer County Community College<br> Finalist: UNCP Women's Basketball - by Andrew Thrift, University of North Carolina Pembroke<br> <br> Data Visualization <br> Winner: International students struggle to learn across time zones as COVID-19 keeps them out of New York - by Jun Yi Zhang, Melissa Wang, Jessica Li, Michelle Xu, Columbia University<br> Finalist: Initiatives take on the challenge of cleaning the Baltimore Harbor, but problems run deep - by James Hartner, Taneen Momeni, The University of Maryland<br> Finalist: VSG Senate pass/fail survey results - by Emery Little, Vanderbilt University<br> <br> Editorial Cartooning <br> Winner: Cartoons - by Reed Steiner, Arizona State University<br> Finalist: Commonwealth Times cartoons - by Lauren Johnson, Virginia Commonwealth University<br> Finalist: Cartoons - by Cristina del Coro Trio, University of Texas at Arlington<br> <br> <B>Audio</B> <br> <br> Radio News Reporting <br> Winner: Campus cooks in decline - by Angelina Campanile, Northwestern University<br> Finalist: Our poisoned kids - by Sydney Gold, Syracuse University<br> Finalist: For people with eating disorders, the pandemic is ‘almost tailor made’ for relapses - by Charlotte Ix, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill<br> <br> Radio Feature <br> Winner: Arizona’s RUF Nation puts Indigenous roots on display through combat athletics - by David Montoya, Arizona State University Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication<br> Finalist: Kayak paddle to save the ecosystem - by Olivia Bensimon, Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY<br> Finalist: A conversation with Alabama Noir contributor Kirk Curnutt - by Baylen Parker, Troy University<br> <br> Radio In-Depth Reporting <br> Winner: Challenging Roe v. Wade: Breaking down today’s abortion debate - by Angelina Campanile, Northwestern University<br> Finalist: Health care proxies in the time of COVID - by Yessenia Moreno, Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY<br> Finalist: Pinal County farmer struggles to grow crops with less water - by Emma VandenEinde, Arizona State University Walter Cronkite School of Journalism<br> <br> Radio Sports Reporting <br> Winner: Athlete mental health - by Matt Yeazel, Marquette University<br> Finalist: Roy Williams retires as UNC men’s basketball coach, saying he’s no longer ‘the right man for the job’ - by Ben Rappaport, Ava Pukatch, Zach Engler, Aurora Charlow, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill<br> Finalist: ‘You’re it!’ Local parkour athlete plays, commentates competitive tag - by Henry Greenstein, Arizona State University Walter Cronkite School of Journalism<br> <br> Best All-Around Radio Newscast <br> Winner: “Carolina Connection” - by staff, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill<br> Finalist: “Ithaca Now” - by staff, Ithaca College<br> <br> Podcast <br> Winner: “Destination: Greenwood” - by Beth Wallis, University of Oklahoma<br> Finalist: “Offbeat” - by staff, University of Maryland<br> Finalist: “No Wiindigo economy”: Student activism and the fight for fossil fuel divestment - by staff, Northwestern University<br> <br> <B>Television</B> <br> <br> Television Breaking News Reporting <br> Winner: Protesting Polisky - by Joey Safchik, Andrew Rowan, Northwestern University<br> <br> Television General News Reporting <br> Winner: Water pipeline - by Katelyn Keenehan, ASU Cronkite School of Journalism<br> Finalist: Surfs up, surf pups! Annual dog surfing competition returns to Huntington Beach - by Sophia Giordano, Emerson College <br> Finalist: Rittenhouse trial verdict divides community - by Grayson Sewell, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee<br> <br> Television Feature Reporting <br> Winner: Never say never - by Chris O'Brien, University of Florida<br> Finalist: Safe at Home - smiling through the pain - by Preston Shoemaker, Penn State University<br> Finalist: Glassblower - by Tim Littau, Manuel Gonzalez Barreto, Marquette University<br> <br> Television In-Depth Reporting <br> Winner: Weathering the storm - by Weathering the Storm staff, University of Montana<br> Finalist: Throwing Up the Hand U - by Derryl Barnes, Gianna Sanchez, University of Miami<br> Finalist: Chinese scholar controversy - by Andrew Fancher, University of North Texas<br> <br> Television Sports Reporting <br> Winner: SIV strong - by Nicholas Moreano, DePaul University<br> Finalist: “The Dopest Dude” on Penn State’s basketball team - by Zach Gershman, Penn State University<br> Finalist: Trash car racing - by Sarah Murphy, Utah State University<br> <br> Best All-Around Television News Magazine <br> Winner: “Our America” - by staff, California State University, Fullerton<br> Finalist: “ViewFinder” - by staff, The University of Maryland<br> Finalist: “Hotty Toddy News” - by staff, University of Mississippi<br> <br> Best All-Around Television Newscast <br> “NewsVision” - by staff, University of Miami<br> Finalist: “Centre County Report” - by Hope Burley, Connor Griffin, Isabel Hayes, Kyle Cannillo, Penn State University<br> Finalist: “IU NewsNet” - by staff, Indiana University<br> <br> <B>Videography</B> <br> <br> Broadcast/Online News Videography <br> Winner: Special Delivery from Atlantic Terminal Squad - by Anthony Ruiz, City College of New York<br> Finalist: John and Esteban - by Ryan Adams, Jenna Galligan, University of Iowa<br> Finalist: Navajo Nation clings for survival - by Brenda Elizondo, California State University Fullerton<br> <br> Broadcast/Online Feature Videography <br> Winner: Urban farming - by Kelly Krabill, Kent State University <br> Finalist: How Chicago lost its commercial fishing industry - by Jacob Ohara, Northwestern University<br> Finalist: Uncertain waters - by Hazel Cramer, University of Montana<br> <br> Broadcast/Online Sports Videography <br> Winner: Rush: Jackson He - by Drake Presto, Arizona State University<br> Finalist: The Comeback Year - by Annie Boos, Syracuse University<br> <br> <B>All Platforms</B> <br> <br> Art/Fashion Journalism <br> Winner: The people behind the instruments - by Irina Matchavariani, Missouri School of Journalism<br> Finalist: Wear Me This - by Sujena Soumyanath, Boston University<br> Finalist: Supporting Style - by Allysann Jackson, Southern Methodist University<br> <br> Collaborative Journalism <br> Winner: Covid reportage in Arkansas - by Mary Hennigan, Abby Zimmardi, Rachell Sanchez-Smith, University of Arkansas<br> Finalist: Illinois divided - by Daily Northwestern staff, Northwestern University<br> <br> Cultural Criticism <br> Winner: Why do we crave creepy shows?; Bridgerton challenges racial expectations; Little Free Libraries - by Kayla Jannetti, Mercer County Community College<br> Finalist: 14 Beats - by Aneesah Shealey, DePaul University<br> Finalist: Film and Television Critique - by Megan Fisher, Luke Jackson, University of Utah<br> <br> Food/Restaurant Journalism <br> Winner: Tlaloc brings Mexican authenticity, family tradition to Athens community - by Nava Rawls, University of Georgia<br> Finalist: Restaurant staffing issues - by Will Sleddins, University of Nebraska - Lincoln<br> <br> Immersion Journalism <br> Winner: Visualizing 81 - by Visualizing 81 staff, Syracuse University<br> <br> Video Game Reporting <br> Winner: Meet the all-womxn speedrunners of Fleet Fatales - by Joseph Stanichar, Ohio University<br> Finalist: UTA varsity Smash Bros. team wins first championship - by Cole Kembel, University of Texas at Arlington<br> Finalist: Keep chasing bonfires - by Austin De Dios, University of Portland<br> <br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the SPJ Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> <br> Tue, 21 Jun 2022 00:00:00 -0500