SPJ News http://www.spj.org/ SPJ Delivers Today's Media News en-us Copyright 2006 Society of Professional Journalists 1440 Kansas City Star receives Pulliam First Amendment Award http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1593 Contacts:<br> Jane Kirtley, SDX Foundation Selection Committee Chair, (612) 625-9038, <email address="jkirtley@spj.org">jkirtley@spj.org</a> <br> Christine Cordial, SPJ Program Coordinator, (317) 920-4788, <email address="ccordial@spj.org">ccordial@spj.org</a> <br> Isaac Taylor, SPJ Communications Coordinator, (317) 920-4785, <email address="itaylor@spj.org">itaylor@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — The <a href="https://www.kansascity.com/news/politics-government/article209025559.html">Kansas City Star</a> has been selected to receive the <a href="https://www.spj.org/a-pulliam.asp">Eugene S. Pulliam First Amendment Award</a> for its work in exposing the secrecy of state government in Kansas last year. <br> <br> Presented by the <a href="https://www.spj.org/sdx.asp">Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>, the <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp">Society of Professional Journalists’</a> educational foundation, the award recognizes those who have fought to protect and preserve one or more of the rights guaranteed by the First Amendment. It is awarded in memory of Eugene S. Pulliam, publisher of The Indianapolis Star and The Indianapolis News from 1975 until his death in 1999. He was a staunch supporter of the First Amendment.<br> <br> According to the Star, the Kansas state government had become one of most secretive in the nation over the past several years, growing worse under then-Governor Sam Brownback. The Star reporting team spent months investigating how officials had kept hidden the workings of the state government, obscuring details of legislation, policies and budgets and punishing agencies that did disclose information. <br> <br> The resulting six-part series, “Why so secret, Kansas?,” spurred changes almost immediately. State legislators proposed 32 bills designed to increase transparency within government, the practice of anonymous legislation was ended in the House of Representatives and the governor put forth four executive orders to improve the accessibility of information to the public.<br> <br> “In its investigation, Star reporters ran into stonewalling politicians and government officials who were upset that the Star was working to shine light on controversial subjects that might put said officials in a bad light,” said leaders of the Kansas Press Association in their joint nomination letter. “But, the reporting team persevered and the public loved it.”<br> <br> According to the Kansas Press Association, the Star played an integral role in the state’s newly adopted efforts to increase openness among government agencies. <br> <br> “Public servants are starting to be held accountable for the lack of transparency to the very people they serve — the people of Kansas,” the Press Association said. “While it is still not perfect, the state of Kansas is making progress and the Kansas City Star helped light the way.”<br> <br> The series was also honored this year as a finalist in the <a href="https://www.kansascity.com/news/politics-government/article209025559.html">Pulitzer Prize public service category</a>.<br> <br> The Kansas City Star will receive a crystal award and travel accommodations to the <a href="http://excellenceinjournalism.org/">Excellence in Journalism 2018</a> conference in Baltimore, Maryland. There, the staff will be honored at the SPJ President’s Installation Banquet. In addition, the Star will be awarded $10,000 by the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation. <br> <br> Learn more about the award and see a list of previous winners <a href="https://www.spj.org/a-pulliam.asp">here</a>.<br> <br> <i>The Sigma Delta Chi Foundation is a public foundation dedicated to ensuring that those who carry on the tradition of a free press are prepared for the challenge. The SDX Foundation supports educational and professional needs of journalists and journalism students. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">Give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> <br> Fri, 17 Aug 2018 00:00:00 -0500 Carolyn Lumsden of the Hartford Courant receives $75,000 Pulliam Fellowship in Editorial Writing http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1592 Contacts:<br> Todd Gillman, Pulliam Editorial Fellowship Selection Chairman, (202) 661-8421, <email address="tgillman@dallasnews.com">tgillman@dallasnews.com</a><br> Christine Cordial, SPJ Program Coordinator, 317-920-4788, <email address="ccordial@spj.org">ccordial@spj.org</a> <br> Isaac Taylor, SPJ Communications Coordinator, (317) 920-4785, <email address="itaylor@spj.org">itaylor@spj.org</a> <br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS - Carolyn Lumsden, opinion editor at the <a href="http://www.courant.com/">Hartford Courant</a>, has been chosen for the 2018 Pulliam Editorial Fellowship. Lumsden plans to spend the next year studying the dangerous effects of pyrrhotite, a little-known mineral that has badly weakened home foundations in Connecticut. <br> <br> As she reported last year in the four-part editorial series “<a href="http://www.courant.com/opinion/editorials/hc-ed-crumbling-foundations-insurance-mortgage-banks-20170527-story.html">Crumbling Foundations</a>,” pyrrhotite can cause some foundations to deteriorate, affecting as many as 34,000 homes in Connecticut alone. Through the Fellowship, Lumsden intends to expand on that work and investigate the mineral’s damage elsewhere, particularly in Canada. <br> <br> In April, “Crumbling Foundations” <a href="http://www.courant.com/news/connecticut/hc-courant-sigma-delta-chi-spj-20180423-story.html">won the Sigma Delta Chi Award for Editorial Writing</a>. The judging for the fellowship was entirely separate, but the fellowship judges were similarly struck by the passion and insight Lumsden’s previous work displayed. <br> <br> "I read that, and thought, 'Wow,'” said judge Michael Bolden, managing director for editorial operations at the John S. Knight Journalism Fellowships at Stanford University. "Work like this demonstrates the importance of a free press, exploring issues and telling stories that affect the lives of our communities and everyday people in the most basic ways."<br> <br> As part of her “Crumbling Foundations” series, Lumsden spent months speaking with geologists, engineers, bankers, lawyers, data analysts and homeowners in Connecticut. <br> <br> She discovered that pyrrhotite damage was a rampant issue in Canada and learned that many homes have been repaired with government aid, whereas American national relief agencies have refused to help those affected by pyrrhotite in Connecticut. Lumsden intends to use her Fellowship to explore how the Canadian government has dealt with the issue, how similar steps can be taken in the U.S. and what states and nations should do to prevent further damage.<br> <br> “Countless homeowners in the United States, Canada and no doubt many other countries have been victimized. Exposing this problem and exploring solutions is important work. [Lumsden] already has made an important contribution and we’re confident she will use this fellowship to build on that,” said Todd Gillman, Washington bureau chief of The Dallas Morning News and chairman of the Pulliam panel.<br> Rochelle Riley, the <a href="https://www.spj.org/news.asp?ref=1537">2017 Pulliam Editorial Fellow</a>, columnist at the Detroit Free Press and a member of this year’s judging panel, said that after reading Lumsden’s series, “I immediately looked at my house” to see if it might be affected, too. “There are very few ideas that are just totally original [and] I just had not thought about that.”<br> <br> The award will be presented to Lumsden by the incoming Sigma Delta Chi Foundation National President this fall in the Hartford Courant newsroom.<br> <br> The $75,000 fellowship is awarded annually by the <a href="https://www.spj.org/sdx.asp">Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>. Learn more about the award and see a list of previous winners <a href="https://www.spj.org/a-pulliamfellow.asp">here</a>.<br> <br> <i>The Sigma Delta Chi Foundation is a public foundation dedicated to ensuring that those who carry on the tradition of a free press are prepared for the challenge. The SDX Foundation supports educational and professional needs of journalists and journalism students. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">Give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>. </i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> Thu, 16 Aug 2018 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ Letter to the Editor in support of free press http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1591 Contacts:<br> Rebecca Baker, SPJ National President, 203-640-3904, <email address="rbaker@spj.org">rbaker@spj.org</a><br> Jennifer Royer, SPJ Communications Strategist, 317-361-4134, <email address="jroyer@spj.org">jroyer@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – <i>The following Letter to the Editor has been submitted to newspapers across the country to show support in their efforts to fight against repeated attacks on the media.</i><br> <br> Dear Editor,<br> <br> The <a href="https://www.spj.org">Society of Professional Journalists</a>, the largest, most broad-based journalism organization in the country, stands in solidarity with the 200-plus newspapers publishing editorials today to fight back against repeated attacks on the media. <br> <br> SPJ’s more than 7,000 members believe in two things: The First Amendment and the <a href="https://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp">SPJ Code of Ethics</a>. The First Amendment states that Congress shall make no law “abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press.” And the SPJ Code of Ethics is a guide to journalists around the world for covering news responsibly.<br> <br> Its four tenets tell journalists to:<br> <br> 1. Seek Truth and Report it<br> <br> 2. Minimize Harm<br> <br> 3. Act Independently<br> <br> 4. Be Accountable and Transparent<br> <br> These goals may sound uncontroversial. Yet since the United States’ inception, some in positions of power have sought to silence the vigilant and courageous watchdogs of the press. Current times are no different. The more those with power spread rhetoric to silence journalism, the more evident it becomes that it is direly needed.<br> <br> We at the Society of Professional Journalists hope that today will be a wake-up call to the millions of Americans who cherish the freedom of expression guarded by the First Amendment.<br> <br> Sincerely,<br> <br> J. Alex Tarquinio<br> SPJ National President-elect<br> Indianapolis, Indiana<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, give to the <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">Legal Defense Fund</a>, or give to the <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate-sdx.asp">Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">—END—</div><br> Wed, 15 Aug 2018 00:00:00 -0500 Ball State University instructor, Colleen Steffen, named outstanding campus adviser http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1590 Christine Cordial, SPJ Awards Coordinator, (317) 920-4788, <email address="ccordial@spj.org">ccordial@spj.org</a> <br> Isaac Taylor, SPJ Communications Coordinator, (317) 920-4785, <email address="itaylor@spj.org">itaylor@spj.org</a> <br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — The <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp">Society of Professional Journalists</a> has named Colleen Steffen as the recipient of this year’s <a href="https://www.spj.org/a-eshelman.asp">David L. Eshelman Outstanding Campus Adviser Award</a>. Steffen teaches at Ball State University, where she advises the student SPJ chapter.<br> <br> The Outstanding Campus Chapter Adviser Award, initiated in 1978, is presented annually to an individual who has made an exceptional contribution to the campus chapter for which he or she serves as SPJ adviser. In 1993, the SPJ Board of Directors voted to change the award name to the David Eshelman Outstanding Campus Adviser Award in order to honor Eshelman, a longtime member of the Society and SPJ Board parliamentarian, who was killed in 1993. A list of previous honorees may be seen <a href="https://www.spj.org/a-eshelman.asp">here</a>.<br> <br> In her nomination letter, chapter president Sophie Gordon says Steffen has acted as a pioneer in developing the BSU student chapter and helping it thrive. According to Gordon, Steffen has rejuvenated the chapter by “working with her officers to transform it into something impactful for the community.”<br> <br> Over the past year, under Steffen’s guidance, the chapter successfully developed educational and social programming aimed at encouraging the larger campus community to identify with journalists and combat fake news – including visits to elementary and middle school classrooms to educate students on the importance of media literacy.<br> <br> “What makes Colleen outstanding is her commitment to students and the organization,” Gordon said. “She makes sure the organization truly is student-driven, but she also makes time to speak with officers and offer guidance whenever she is needed. From giving us lists of contacts in the community to throwing out ideas for events, she gives suggestions but empowers students to make the decision. This leadership style has allowed students to grow as leaders themselves and become productive collaborators.”<br> <br> Steffen will be honored at <a href="http://excellenceinjournalism.org/">Excellence in Journalism 2018, Sept. 27-29</a> in Baltimore.<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a>, or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> Tue, 14 Aug 2018 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ selects José Luis Benavides for Distinguished Teaching in Journalism Award http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1588 Contacts: <br> Christine Cordial, SPJ Awards Coordinator, (317) 920-4788, <email address="ccordial@spj.org">ccordial@spj.org</a><br> Isaac Taylor, SPJ Communications Coordinator, (317) 920-4785, <email address="itaylor@spj.org">itaylor@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — The <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp">Society of Professional Journalists</a> has chosen José Luis Benavides, professor of journalism at California State University, Northridge, as the recipient of the <a href="https://www.spj.org/a-teaching.asp">Distinguished Teaching in Journalism Award.</a><br> <br> Each year, SPJ honors an outstanding journalism educator who has made an exceptional contribution to the profession and/or journalism education. Benavides won this year with detailed letters of support from faculty and students in the Department of Journalism at CSUN who lauded Benavides for how deeply he cares for his students and their work.<br> <br> “[Benavides] founded the department’s student-run Spanish language multimedia site, <a href="http://elnuevosol.net/">El Nuevo Sol</a>,” Department of Journalism Chair Linda Bowen wrote in a nomination letter. “Many of the students he has mentored are the first in their families to attend college and are working more than 40 or more hours a week … His ability to connect with and inspire them to believe in themselves has literally changed hundreds of our students’ lives.”<br> <br> After noticing an industry trend of many internships being unpaid, Benavides worked with the Latino Journalists, a club he founded, to raise money for students who worked in unpaid internships. He and his organization were able to raise over $5,000 to help students gain internship experience who otherwise would not have had the opportunity.<br> <br> Benavides graduated from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico in 1985. He then received his master’s degree in journalism from the University of Texas at Austin in 1989 and graduated with his Ph.D. in interdisciplinary studies from UT Austin in 1997. <br> <br> Outside the classroom, Benavides has helped inform and educate members of his journalism community, serving as a panelist for local SPJ chapter events and presenting data on diversity to the editorial staff of the Los Angeles Daily News.<br> <br> Benavides will be honored at the <a href="http://excellenceinjournalism.org/">Excellence in Journalism 2018</a> conference in Baltimore, Maryland, Sept. 27-29.<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a>, or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> Thu, 9 Aug 2018 00:00:00 -0500 Brown named Galvan Outstanding Graduate in Journalism recipient http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1587 Contacts:<br> Christine Cordial, Program Coordinator, 317-920-4788, <email address="ccordial@spj.org">ccordial@spj.org</a> <br> Isaac Taylor, SPJ Communications Coordinator, 317-920-4785, <email address="itaylor@spj.org">itaylor@spj.org</a> <br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – The <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp">Society of Professional</a> Journalists is pleased to honor Soni Brown with the 2018 <a href="https://www.spj.org/a-galvan.asp">Julie Galvan Outstanding Graduate in Journalism Award</a>. Brown is a 2018 graduate of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, where she served as president of the SPJ campus chapter.<br> <br> The award is named in memory of Julie Galvan, former president of the San Jose State University SPJ Campus Chapter, who was killed in a car accident in 1996 while on her way to an internship. At the close of the college year, SPJ national leadership bestows the award to one graduate who is outstanding in their class based on character, service, scholarship, proficiency in practical journalism and significant contributions to the chapter.<br> <br> “Soni's perseverance, dedication and infectious enthusiasm for journalism have contributed great things not only to her student chapter and university, but also to local organizations like ours,” wrote Wesley Juhl, president of the SPJ Las Vegas professional chapter. <br> <br> As chapter president, Brown was a proactive force in seeking career growth opportunities for herself and her peers. She has obtained Google News Tools training for her university, offering training to students and professors. In addition, she organized several campus events, including a weekly “Brown Bag Social Hour” for members to network and learn from professionals.<br> <br> Brown is also treasurer of the local chapter of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. She has used her roles as NAHJ treasurer and SPJ chapter president to bring attention to the needs of students and foster connectivity among chapter members and professionals. <br> <br> “What differentiates Soni from other such accomplished students, however, is her sheer dedication to the field and her peers,” Juhl wrote. “She has ingrained herself in the local journalism community, and in doing so, she has made every effort to bolster the reputation of her journalism school and SPJ chapter.”<br> <br> Brown will be recognized at the <a href=” http://excellenceinjournalism.org/”>Excellence in Journalism 2018</a> conference Sept. 27-29 in Baltimore. Click <a href=” https://www.spj.org/a-galvan.asp”>here</a> for a list of past winners. <br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href=” https://www.spj.org/join.asp”>Become a member</a>, <a href=” https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp”>give to the Legal Defense Fund</a>, or <a href=” https://www.spj.org/donate.asp”>give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>.</i><br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> Mon, 6 Aug 2018 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ honors Cassidy Grom with Robert D.G. Lewis First Amendment Award http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1586 Contact:<br> Christine Cordial, Program Coordinator, 317-920-4788, <email address="ccrodial@spj.org">ccordial@spj.org</a> <br> Isaac Taylor, SPJ Communications Coordinator, 317-920-4785, <email address="itaylor@spj.org">itaylor@spj.org</a> <br> <br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – The <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp">Society of Professional Journalists</a> is pleased to award Cassidy Grom with the <a href="https://www.spj.org/c-grant-dglewis.asp">Robert D.G. Lewis First Amendment Award</a>. The award honors an SPJ student member who has demonstrated outstanding service to the First Amendment through their work in journalism.<br> <br> A recent graduate of Taylor University in Upland, Indiana, Grom led her school paper, The Echo, and is currently a reporting intern at New Jersey’s The Star-Ledger and Nj.com. She is also a graduate of the McCandlish Phillips Journalism Institute in New York City. She will receive complimentary convention registration and travel expenses for <a href="http://excellenceinjournalism.org/">Excellence in Journalism 2018</a>. <br> <br> During her sophomore year at Taylor, Grom was struck by a section of the university’s student press policy that allowed the school to censor reporting that could “taint the public image of the university.” Over the next two years, Grom observed continued suppression of the paper’s First Amendment guarantees as several articles were barred from being published online and newspapers would disappear from the stands when tour groups came through the university. <br> <br> “I sat in meeting after meeting with university personnel,” said Grom. “They tried to get me to stop asking difficult questions and I tried to get them to change the policy. We would stare at each other, neither of us willing to budge. So this year, my senior year, I decided to survey our peer institutions in the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities. I thought if I could prove that those schools had more press freedom, I could finally convince our administration to change Taylor’s policies.”<br> <br> Instead, Grom’s survey revealed a common theme among Christian universities, as 70 percent of the schools surveyed allow for advisers to control what stories are printed. To combat this overwhelming issue, Grom and her colleagues formed the <a href="https://studentpresscoalition.wordpress.com/">Student Press Coalition</a>, a research and advocacy group designed to explore and improve the intersection of press freedoms and Christian higher education. <br> <br> The coalition’s research has been picked up by numerous national outlets and has spurred Taylor University to review its student press policy. <br> <br> “Alumni from Christian schools reached out saying they were glad our research finally brought these issues to light,” Grom said. “Student editors called, sharing story after story of intimidation of the press, and thanked us for showing them they are not alone in their struggle to publish the truth on their campuses. Professional journalists emailed us, praising us for demanding a better education in ethical journalism; one even offered funding to help us continue the cause.”<br> <br> Grom will be recognized at the Student Union held during EIJ18, Sept. 27-29 in Baltimore.<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a>, or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> Fri, 3 Aug 2018 00:00:00 -0500 Mary Ellen Klas, Rachel La Corte and ProPublica honored for contributions to open government http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1585 Contacts: <br> Christine Cordial, Program Coordinator, 317-920-4788, <email address="ccordial@spj.org">ccordial@spj.org</a> <br> Isaac Taylor, SPJ Communications Coordinator, 317-920-4785, <email address="itaylor@spj.org">itaylor@spj.org</a><br> <br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — Mary Ellen Klas, Rachel La Corte and ProPublica have each been awarded the <a href="https://www.spj.org/a-sunshine.asp">Sunshine Award</a> from the <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp">Society of Professional Journalists</a>. A judging panel, composed of <a href="https://www.spj.org/spjboard.asp">SPJ Board of Directors</a> and <a href="https://www.spj.org/com-foi.asp">Freedom of Information Committee</a> members, bestows the award each year to individuals and organizations for their notable contributions to open government. <br> <br> <b>Mary Ellen Klas, Miami Herald</b><br> <a href="http://www.tampabay.com/author/mary-ellen-klas/">Mary Ellen Klas</a> is the <a href="https://www.miamiherald.com/">Miami Herald</a>'s capital bureau chief and has been covering government and politics in Florida for 30 years. Her tenacity in accessing government information, reporting and writing it have proven vital in the progression of open government. <br> <br> “[Klas] will go through every word of every public record before her byline goes on a story,” Florida-based lawyer Florence Snyder wrote in regard to Klas. “She attends court hearings and public meetings in person, even if the proceedings are on cable TV. Mary Ellen’s contributions to open government are more than important. They are singular.”<br> <br> <b>Rachel La Corte, Associated Press</b><br> Rachel La Corte has been a reporter for the <a href="https://www.ap.org/en-us/">Associated Press</a> for more than 20 years.<br> <br> She has covered Washington state politics since January 2005 and was previously based out of AP's Miami and Tampa offices, where she covered a variety of national stories, including the 2000 presidential election and the international custody battle between the U.S. and Cuba over Elian Gonzalez.<br> <br> Last year, she spearheaded a <a href="https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/ap-other-media-sue-for-info-from-washington-state-lawmakers/">lawsuit against the Washington Legislature</a> over lawmakers' claims that they are exempt from the state's Public Records Act.<br> <br> “La Corte’s ongoing efforts to open up the state legislative process have already produced one positive ruling and have sparked efforts to force the Legislature to simply make clear in statute that they are subject to public disclosure laws,” the Associated Press’ Northwest News Editor Chris Grygiel wrote in his nomination letter.<br> <br> <b>ProPublica</b><br> <a href="https://www.propublica.org/">ProPublica</a> is an independent, nonprofit newsroom that produces investigative journalism.<br> <br> The organization focuses on stories with the potential to spur real-world impact. Among other positive changes, their reporting has contributed to the passage of new laws, reversals of harmful policies and practices and accountability for leaders at local, state and national levels.<br> <br> ProPublica, while covering appointees to federal agencies made by the Trump administration, created <a href="https://projects.propublica.org/trump-town/">one of the most exhaustive lists</a> that details the names, titles and roles of hundreds of political appointees.<br> <br> This initiative was taken to increase transparency regarding the newly appointed White House staffers and federal employees following Trump’s election.<br> <br> The organization filed more than 200 FOIA and Form 201 ethics requests to obtain the data and worked with dozens of FOIA officers, ethics attorneys and nonpartisan groups for guidance. It is for this level of tenacity in government reporting that ProPublica is being recognized.<br> <br> The recipients will be recognized at the SPJ President’s Installation Banquet at <a href="http://excellenceinjournalism.org/">Excellence in Journalism 2018</a> in Baltimore Sept. 27-29. <br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>,<a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a>, or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> Thu, 2 Aug 2018 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ recognizes two members’ outstanding contributions with Howard Dubin Award http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1584 Contacts: <br> Christine Cordial, Program Coordinator, 317-920-4788,<email address="ccordial@spj.org"> ccordial@spj.org</a> <br> Isaac Taylor, SPJ Communications Coordinator, 317-920-4785,<email address="itaylor@spj.org"> itaylor@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — Navid Nonahal and Jennifer Ellis were selected to receive the Howard S. Dubin Outstanding Pro Member Award from the <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp">Society of Professional Journalists</a> for their outstanding contributions to their SPJ chapters and regions.<br> <br> Each year, this award is given to no more than two members — one from a chapter of 75 or more members and one from less than 75 members. The award is in honor of longtime SPJ member of the Chicago Headline Club Howard Dubin, who not only contributes time and money to the Society but also remains dedicated to service at the chapter level.<br> <br> <b>Navid Nonahal</b><br> Nonahal was nominated by Roberta Wax, former Dubin Award honoree, and Dr. Richard Hendrickson, treasurer of the Greater Los Angeles Pro Chapter. She has been on her chapter board for nearly two decades, having served as chapter president for three consecutive years. Nonahal is described as a driving force in the Greater Los Angeles Pro Chapter’s success, playing pivotal roles in chapter events, membership drives, insurance research, financial stewardship and more. As immediate past president of the chapter, Nonahal continues to contribute her institutional knowledge, unique expertise and optimistic voice to chapter work.<br> <br> <b>Jennifer Ellis</b><br> Ellis was nominated by several members of the Arkansas Pro Chapter and its board. She is the current chapter president and plays a key role in organizing, marketing and overseeing chapter events, including this year’s Region 12 Conference in Little Rock. Her fellow board members credit Ellis for helping to revitalize the chapter, increase its membership and plan robust, regular programming. It addition, she manages the chapter’s social media accounts and website, all while maintaining her daily work at Arkansas’ largest newspaper, the <i>Arkansas Democrat-Gazette</i>.<br> <br> Nonahal and Ellis will be recognized at <a href="http://excellenceinjournalism.org/">Excellence in Journalism 2018</a> in Baltimore, Sept. 27-29. <br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund,</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation.</a></i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> Tue, 31 Jul 2018 00:00:00 -0500 Journalists from NPR/Minnesota Public Radio earn SPJ Ethics in Journalism Award for exceptional, ethical journalism http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1583 Contacts:<br> Christine Cordial, Program Coordinator, 317-920-4788, <email address="ccrodial@spj.org">ccordial@spj.org</a> <br> Isaac Taylor, SPJ Communications Coordinator, 317-920-4785, <email address="itaylor@spj.org">itaylor@spj.org</a> <br> <br> <i>Update: This press release was updated on 8/13/2018 to include names of other reporters on the project.</i><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — The <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp">Society of Professional Journalists</a> has bestowed the 2018 Ethics in Journalism Awards to journalists at NPR and Minnesota Public Radio for extraordinary reporting on the topic of sexual harassment within or connected to their own organizations.<br> <br> The Ethics in Journalism Award honors journalists or news organizations that perform in an outstanding ethical manner demonstrating the ideals of the <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp">SPJ Code of Ethics</a>.<br> <br> NPR did exemplary work in <a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/10/31/561267272/nprs-head-of-news-placed-on-leave-after-past-harassment-allegations-surface">covering allegations against Michael Oreskes</a>, its senior vice president of news, as well as <a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/11/28/567026934/npr-chief-news-editor-departs-in-wake-of-harassment-allegations">others within the organization</a>, particularly through extensive reporting by David Folkenflik and Merrit Kennedy.<br> <br> Mary Louise Kelly conducted <a href="https://www.npr.org/2017/11/01/561427869/top-npr-new-executive-mike-oreskes-resigns-amid-allegations-of-sexual-harassment">a powerful interview of NPR CEO Jarl Mohn</a>, showing persistence and grit.<br> <br> The MPR News staff dug in to explore allegations against “A Prairie Home Companion” founding host Garrison Keillor and how the company handled the allegations. MPR’s parent company distributed Keillor’s show and owed much of its success to him.<br> <br> The masterful work, <a href="https://www.mprnews.org/story/2018/01/23/keillor-workplace">including reporting by Laura Yuen, Euan Kerr and Matt Sepic</a>, provided a much fuller, richer account of the circumstances, going well beyond the initial vague statements by MPR executives. Until their reporting, Keillor drove the narrative regarding his behavior in the workplace.<br> <br> Editors in both newsrooms did strong work in shaping the coverage and shielding it from possible influence from management.<br> <br> Both organizations met high standards of transparency, too, with disclosures explaining the lines they drew to preserve the independence of their reporting. They pursued truth with neither fear nor favor.<br> <br> Folkenflik took the extraordinary step of refusing to participate in off-the-record staff discussions about the allegations <a href="https://www.npr.org/2017/11/03/561952314/tensions-build-in-npr-newsroom-over-handling-of-sexual-harassment-allegations">so as not to compromise his ability to cover the story within his newsroom</a>. Other reporters and editors involved in the coverage similarly did not attend staff meetings about the topic they were covering.<br> <br> Folkenflik and Kennedy worked with a small cadre of colleagues within a protocol that Folkenflik and his editors developed over a period of years to ensure the integrity and independence of their reporting on their own network. NPR was open and straightforward in <a href="https://www.npr.org/2017/11/16/564629232/chairman-steps-down-as-npr-grapples-with-harassment-crisis">explaining the boundaries and safeguards</a> it established.<br> <br> MPR also was a model of transparency in explaining <a href="https://www.mprnews.org/story/2018/01/23/keillor-story-how-mpr-news-is-covering">how it steered clear of potential entanglements</a>.<br> <br> “What distinguished NPR and MPR in the media world was their treatment of the news when it involved their own staff members and management,” SPJ Region 2 director Andy Schotz said. “While [others] largely passed along statements from top executives and, on the air, told viewers how upset they were, NPR and MPR dug in as journalists, with the same drive and thoroughness as if the stories had happened somewhere else.”<br> <br> In his nomination letter, Schotz noted that the NPR/MPR teams’ actions and reporting exhibited outstanding ethical behavior in alignment with the SPJ Code of Ethics.<br> <br> Schotz said, “They interviewed colleagues. They pressed top managers and leaders. They developed sources. And they didn’t hold back in their reporting despite the obvious awkwardness of being in the middle of an important news story.”<br> <br> The winners will be recognized during the President’s Installation Banquet at the <a href="http://excellenceinjournalism.org/">Excellence in Journalism 2018</a> conference in Baltimore, Maryland.<br> <br> A complete list of previous winners is available <a href="https://www.spj.org/a-ethics.asp">online</a>.<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a>, or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> Mon, 30 Jul 2018 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ sends letters of support to CNN, WHCA after journalist barred from White House event http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1582 Contacts:<br> Rebecca Baker, SPJ National President, 203-640-3904, <email address="rbaker@spj.org">rbaker@spj.org</a> <br> Jennifer Royer, SPJ Director of Communications and Marketing, 317-361-4134, <email address="jroyer@spj.org">jroyer@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – The <a href=" https://www.spj.org/">Society of Professional Journalists</a> today <a href=" http://www.spj.org/pdf/letter/CNN-Letter-07262018.pdf">sent letters to CNN</a> and the <a href="http://www.spj.org/pdf/letter/WHCA-Letter-07262018.pdf">White House Correspondents’ Association</a> in support of journalist Kaitlan Collins and all journalists who cover the White House.<br> <br> The letters were in response to <a href="https://money.cnn.com/2018/07/26/media/kaitlan-collins-white-house-rose-garden/index.html">CNN’s Collins being barred from attending a presidential event in the Rose Garden</a> on Wednesday. The letters, signed by SPJ National President Rebecca Baker, said, “SPJ is deeply concerned with the White House’s behavior and attitude toward journalists and freedom of the press.”<br> <br> SPJ stands with CNN, WHCA and other news organizations, in taking a stance against banning reporters and journalists from open government meetings and sessions. <br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href=" https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>,<a href=" https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a>, or <a href=" https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">—END—</center><br> Thu, 26 Jul 2018 00:00:00 -0500 The Arizona Republic & USA Today Network receive SPJ New America Award for “The Wall” project http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1581 Contacts:<br> Christine Cordial, Program Coordinator, 317-920-4788, <email address="ccordial@spj.org">ccordial@spj.org</a><br> Isaac Taylor, SPJ Communications Coordinator, 317-920-4785, <email address="itaylor@spj.org">itaylor@spj.org</a> <br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — The <a href=” https://www.spj.org/”>Society of Professional Journalists</a> is happy to recognize <a href=” https://www.azcentral.com/”>The Arizona Republic</a> with the <a href=” https://www.usatoday.com/”>USA Today Network</a> as the recipient of the 2017 <a href=” https://www.spj.org/a-newamerica.asp”>New America Award.</a><br> <br> The New America Award honors journalism that sheds light on important issues of immigrant or ethnic communities in the United States.<br> <br> A USA Today Network special report by The Arizona Republic, “The Wall” examines the lives of those people affected by the idea of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, on all sides. <br> <br> “The Wall addresses more globally what a lot of other stories tried to address in a more micro fashion by telling stories from a single place,” said the judges’ comments. “The Wall illustrates the immigration issue across the Southwest in areas that vary widely in terms of reception and acceptance of immigrants. It’s an amazing look at the technicalities and the people of the United States border with Mexico, from aerial video describing the border areas to stories about the people whose daily lives are impacted by immigration crackdowns.”<br> <br> The full series can be found <a href=" https://www.usatoday.com/border-wall/">here.</a><br> <br> The New America Award is celebrating 14 years of honoring work focused on immigrant or ethnic communities. This year’s recipients will be honored at the SPJ President’s Installation Banquet on Saturday, Sept. 29, during the <a href=” http://excellenceinjournalism.org/”>Excellence in Journalism 2018</a> conference in Baltimore.<br> Find the details about the New America Award, including past recipients, <a href="https://www.spj.org/a-newamerica.asp">here.</a><br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href=” https://www.spj.org/join.asp”>Become a member</a>, <a href=” https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp”>give to the Legal Defense Fund,</a> or <a href=” https://www.spj.org/donate.asp”>give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation.</a></i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ encourages federal judge to rescind ruling against The Los Angeles Times http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1580 Contacts:<br> Rebecca Baker, SPJ National President, 203-640-3904, <email address="rbaker@spj.org">rbaker@spj.org</a> <br> Jennifer Royer, SPJ Director of Communications and Marketing, 317-361-4134, <email address="jroyer@spj.org">jroyer@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – The <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp">Society of Professional Journalists</a> is disappointed that a federal judge has ordered a newspaper to remove information from a published article.<br> <br> The New York Times reports that a federal judge <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/15/us/judge-los-angeles-times-delete-article.html">ordered The Los Angeles Times to remove information from a published article</a> on Saturday, which described a plea agreement between prosecutors and a police narcotics detective in Glendale, Calif., who was accused of colluding with a Mexican crime syndicate.<br> <br> Our nation is fortunate to have the First Amendment enshrine protection of a free press into the foundation of our country. Unfortunately, we have a judge arbitrarily ordering a news organization to delete information. The fact that federal courts cannot force news organizations to unpublish or withhold information they’ve legally obtained was settled decades ago.<br> <br> We encourage U.S. District Judge John F. Walter to support the Constitution and a free press by rescinding his ruling. We also encourage all judges to read <a href="https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/435/829/">the late Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart’s opinion</a> in Landmark Communications, Inc. v. Virginia: "Though government may deny access to information and punish its theft, government may not prohibit or punish the publication of that information once it falls into the hands of the press, unless the need for secrecy is manifestly overwhelming." <br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a>, or <a href=" https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation.</a></i><br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> Mon, 16 Jul 2018 00:00:00 -0500 Todd, Rosenthal, Woodruff honored as Fellows of the Society for outstanding service to journalism http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1579 Contacts:<br> Christine Cordial, Program Coordinator, 317-920-4788, <email address="ccordial@spj.org"> ccordial@spj.org</a><br> Isaac Taylor, SPJ Communications Coordinator, 317-920-4785, <email address="itaylor@spj.org" > itaylor@spj.org </a><br> <br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — The <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp"> Society of Professional Journalists </a> recognizes Chuck Todd, Robert J. Rosenthal and Judy Woodruff as <a href="https://www.spj.org/a-fellowsOTS.asp"> Fellows of the Society</a>, the highest professional honor awarded by SPJ, for extraordinary contribution to the profession of journalism.<br> <br> <b>Chuck Todd</b> is currently the moderator of NBC’s “Meet the Press” and NBC News political director. He has covered politics for nearly three decades, serving as NBC News chief White House correspondent from 2008 to 2014 and hosting MSNBC’s “The Daily Rundown” from 2010 to 2014. Prior to joining NBC News, Todd spent 15 years at the National Journal’s “The Hotline,” serving as editor-in-chief for six of those years.<br> <br> “Todd spearheads the network’s premier political coverage, offering his sharp analysis and translation of Beltway politics across all platforms – zeroing in on what really matters in Washington and why,” said Sarah Blackwell, Senior Producer of “Meet the Press.” “He is known for holding politicians and newsmakers accountable: from pressing White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway on ‘alternative facts’ to asking House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi if accused Congressman John Conyers should be ‘in or out,’ his interviews and deep-sourced reporting consistently drive headlines, and have made ‘Meet the Press’ the #1 most-watched Sunday public affairs program for the 2016-2017 season.”<br> <br> Todd’s cable show (“MTP Daily”) and his podcast (“1947: The Meet the Press Podcast”) showcase his provocative interviewing style and have helped to expand “Meet the Press,” the longest-running show in television history, into the modern age. Todd is also the author of two books: “How Barack Obama Won,” released in 2009 and co-authored with Sheldon Gawiser; and “The Stranger: Barack Obama in the White House,” released in 2014.<br> <br> <br> <b>Robert J. Rosenthal</b> was nominated for his remarkable contributions to journalism after many years as an award-winning journalist, and later as executive director of the Center for Investigative Reporting.<br> <br> His career in journalism has spanned nearly 50 years. Beginning as editorial assistant on the Pulitzer Prize-winning Pentagon Papers project at The New York Times, Rosenthal spent the next three decades working for the Times, Boston Globe, Philadelphia Inquirer and the San Francisco Chronicle. He is the recipient of the Overseas Press Club Award for magazine writing and the 1985 Sigma Delta Chi award for foreign correspondence. Rosenthal is also a Pulitzer Prize finalist in international reporting.<br> <br> “Robert — affectionately known within journalism as ‘Rosey’ — continues to distinguish himself as a consummate leader in journalism ethics and a mentor, leader and innovator in journalism,” said Thomas J. Brennan, founder of The War Horse and Rosenthal’s nominator. “Rosey has been the most vocal and proactive supporter and advisor to our newsroom, helping me to grow our team and fundraise our operating budget — helping to triple our budget in two years and to forge partnerships at graduate schools of journalism at NYU, CUNY, and Columbia University. Because of his leadership and unwavering support, our newsroom has the strong moral and ethical foundation on which all newsrooms should be built.”<br> <br> Rosenthal currently serves as a board member at the Center for Investigative Reporting, the Institute for Nonprofit News and the Carey Institute for Global Good.<br> <br> <br> <b>Judy Woodruff</b> is anchor and managing editor of the PBS NewsHour. A multi-award-winning journalist, she has spent more than four decades covering politics across networks. Woodruff served as anchor and senior correspondent for CNN for 12 years, was the chief Washington correspondent for the MacNeil/Lehrer NewHour at PBS from 1983 to 1993 and anchored PBS’ “Frontline with Judy Woodruff” from 1984 to 1990.<br> <br> “Over her 50 years in the TV news business, Judy Woodruff has truly become the dean of political reporters. From her earliest days in Atlanta — where she parlayed a position as secretary at the local ABC affiliate into a five-year stint covering the Georgia Statehouse — Woodruff has offered reasoned and responsible coverage of our nation's top political players,” said the SPJ Executive Committee awards selection team. “She's covered every president and convention since Jimmy Carter. She's lent her name and her advocacy to more than a dozen organizations dedicated to good journalism. SPJ is exceptionally proud to add Judy Woodruff to its list of Fellows of the Society.”<br> <br> Woodruff is a founding co-chair of the International Women's Media Foundation, an organization committed to promoting and encouraging females in communication industries worldwide. She is the recent recipient of the Cine Lifetime Achievement award, the Edward R. Murrow Lifetime Achievement Award in Broadcast Journalism/Television and the inaugural Gwen Ifill Press Freedom Award from the Committee to Protect Journalists, among many others.<br> <br> Todd, Rosenthal and Woodruff will be honored as Fellows of the Society at the <a href="http://excellenceinjournalism.org/"> Excellence in Journalism 2018 conference,</a> in Baltimore, Sept. 27-29. During the President’s Installation Banquet on Sept. 29, they will each receive a jeweled key and plaque for their contributions. A list of previous honorees is available <a href="https://www.spj.org/a-fellowsOTS.asp">here</a>.<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a>, or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> <div align"=center">--END--</center><br> Fri, 13 Jul 2018 08:43:45 -0500 Wall Street Journal editor to give keynote speech at Ted Scripps Leadership Institute http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1578 Contacts:<br> Alison Bethel McKenzie, SPJ Executive Director, 317-927-8000,<email address="abmckenzie@spj.org"> abmckenzie@spj.org</a> <br> Isaac Taylor, SPJ Communications Coordinator, 317-920-4785, <email address="itaylor@spj.org">itaylor@spj.org</a> <br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – <a href="https://www.spj.org/scrippslt.asp">The Ted Scripps Leadership Institute</a>, an event dedicated to helping participants become better leaders, will be held in Indianapolis July 27-29.<br> <br> SPJ members in Region 5 – Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky – interested in leadership are encouraged to apply. SPJ also encourages chapters to send one or two members of their board.<br> <br> <a href= "https://www.spj.org/scripps-indy.asp">Kimberly S. Johnson</a> of the Wall Street Journal will share her experiences during a “fireside chat,” moderated by <a href= "https://www.spj.org/scripps-indy.asp">Leisa Richardson</a> of the IndyStar. Johnson will discuss her path to senior management at one of the world’s finest journalistic organizations, and pitfalls to avoid when managing others.<br> <br> The keynote address will be given at lunch on July 28 by WRTV-6 general manager <a href= "https://www.poynter.org/person/lana-durban-scott">Lana Durban Scott</a>. She will discuss how she overcame obstacles to become one of the first women to manage a television station in Indianapolis.<br> <br> Participants will learn new insights on how to motivate peers, the dynamics of group decision-making, the role a leader plays in managing through change and many more leadership skills.<br> <br> Each selected participant will be required to make an investment of $75 in their training upon acceptance into the program. If accepted, each individual must participate in all training sessions and/or activities held during the Institute.<br> <br> The Institute will be located in the Indy Marriott hotel. Participants are responsible for their travel costs, but lodging and most meals are provided.<br> <br> To apply,<a href= "https://www.spj.org/scrippslt-form.asp">complete this form</a>.<br> <br> The program was established in 1996 and is funded through a generous grant from the <a href= "http://www.scripps.com/foundation/"> Scripps Howard Foundation</a>.<br> <br> The Institute is named for Ted Scripps, grandson of the founder of The E.W. Scripps Company. The funding is provided through the Scripps Howard Foundation by Ted's sons, Edward W. Scripps Jr. and William H. Scripps, as a way to honor their father's memory.<br> <br> The Ted Scripps Leadership Institute provides journalists with leadership tools to make their media organizations stronger, and continues to build that network of support for leaders at the local level.<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href= "https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a>, or <a href=" https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation.</a></i><br> <div align"=center">--END--</center><br> Fri, 6 Jul 2018 00:00:00 -0500 Veteran journalist Rod Hicks named SPJ’s first Journalist on Call http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1577 Contacts:<br> Alison Bethel McKenzie, SPJ Executive Director, 317-927-8000, <email address="abmckenzie@spj.org">abmckenzie@spj.org </a><br> Jennifer Royer, SPJ Director of Communications and Marketing, 317-361-4134, <email address="jroyer@spj.org">jroyer@spj.org</a> <br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – In an effort to address the issue of dwindling trust in the media, the <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp">Society of Professional Journalists<endlink> has named veteran journalist Rod Hicks as its first Journalist on Call.<br> <br> <img src="https://www.spj.org/images/headshots/rodhicks.jpg" class="right" style="max-width:40%; height:auto;">SPJ’s Journalist on Call is a unique, three-year position, developed and funded by the <a href="https://www.spj.org/sdx.asp">Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>, which supports the educational mission of SPJ. <br> <br> Hicks, a native of Birmingham, Alabama, has experience at numerous news organizations across the country. Most recently, he served as an editor for <a href="https://www.ap.org/en-us/">The Associated Press</a> at its Philadelphia-based East Regional Desk, which manages news coverage in 10 states. In this role, he worked on several major national stories including the Sandy Hook school shooting in Connecticut, the Boston Marathon bombing and the sexual assault trials of Bill Cosby.<br> <br> “We had many outstanding candidates for this position. Rod’s experience, enthusiasm and ability to communicate with people from all walks of life make him perfect for this role,” said Alison Bethel McKenzie, SPJ executive director. “He brings an abundance of great ideas to the table, and we are eager for him to begin this important work.”<br> <br> Hicks will serve as something of an ombudsman, helping journalists understand why the public doesn’t trust them and what they can do to re-earn more trust. He will also spend time with the general public, local officials and community groups to explain the important role ethical journalism plays in society. A great deal of the focus will center on how the media and public can work together in crisis situations. He will begin July 16.<br> <br> “We live in a time when distrust of the press is at alarming levels. Democracy depends on civic engagement, and civic engagement should be built on a foundation of truth. We need someone to help calm the waters, build bridges and be a resource to both public and news media. Rod is the right person to do this," said SDX Foundation President Robert Leger.<br> <br> Hicks previously held editing positions at newspapers in New Jersey, Alabama, Michigan and Missouri. He managed the St. Louis Post-Dispatch news operation at night, making key decisions on how stories were shaped and presented and ensuring they adhered to high journalistic standards. He was working the night a gunman entered a suburban city council meeting and killed the mayor, two council members, a police officer and two other people. The coverage was a finalist for the 2009 Pulitzer Prize in Breaking News.<br> <br> Before that, he managed the 30-person staff of editors, reporters and support personnel spread across seven offices as suburban editor for The Detroit News. He also led the development and launch of 13 targeted community newspapers for The News.<br> <br> "We are at a critical time in our democracy — a time when citizens more than ever need to understand the need for an aggressive free press. I will work to help them understand why this is so vital to every individual in our country," Hicks said.<br> <br> Hicks also has experience in the classroom. He taught introductory and advanced journalism classes for four years at Talladega College, an HBCU in Alabama, and twice served as a visiting professor at the University of Alabama. More recently, he developed and taught a two-day business writing class for NASA employees at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.<br> <br> Hicks led the planning and execution of three successful conventions for the <a href="https://www.nabj.org/">National Association of Black Journalists</a> — in Philadelphia in 2011, New Orleans in 2012 and Minneapolis in 2015. <br> <br> “This position – and Rod’s expertise – are needed to help the public understand the role of a free press in a democracy, and I’m confident his work will make a difference for journalism and society,” said SPJ National President Rebecca Baker.<br> <br> Hicks holds a master’s degree in newspaper management from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University and a bachelor’s degree in mass communication from the University of Alabama. While at Northwestern, he worked briefly as a Washington correspondent for The Herald-Sun in Durham, North Carolina, and spent three months working at the European headquarters of Time magazine in London, England.<br> <br> <i> SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund,</a> or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation.</a></i><br> <br> <i>The Sigma Delta Chi Foundation is a public foundation dedicated to ensuring that those who carry on the tradition of a free press are prepared for the challenge. The SDX Foundation supports educational and professional needs of journalists and journalism students. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">Give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation.</a></i><br> <div align"=center">--END--</div><br> Mon, 2 Jul 2018 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ Statement on Annapolis Shooting http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1575 Contacts:<br> Rebecca Baker, SPJ National President, 203-640-3904, <email address="rbaker@spj.org">rbaker@spj.org</a><br> Jennifer Royer, SPJ Director of Communications and Marketing, 317-361-4134, <email address="jroyer@spj.org">jroyer@spj.org</a><br> <br> <br> The following statement may be attributed to SPJ National President Rebecca Baker.<br> <br> "SPJ is deeply saddened by the <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2018/06/28/shooting-annapolis-newspaper-suspect-custody-police-say/743150002/">reports from Annapolis, Maryland,</a> that a shooter entered the Annapolis Capital Gazette building and shot several people. Our hearts go out to the victims and their family, friends and colleagues. We are ready to help in any way we can." <br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a>, or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>.</i><br> <div align"=center">-END-</center> Thu, 28 Jun 2018 00:00:00 -0500 Bethel McKenzie to participate in Sen. Hassan 'state of the media' panel in Washington http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1574 Contacts:<br> Alison Bethel McKenzie, SPJ Executive Director, 317-927-8000, <email address="abmckenzie@spj.org">abmckenzie@spj.org</a><br> Isaac Taylor, SPJ Communications Coordinator, 317-920-4785, <email address="itaylor@spj.org">itaylor@spj.org</a> <br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp">Society of Professional Journalists</a> Executive Director Alison Bethel McKenzie will discuss the state of the media as a panelist Wednesday in Washington, D.C.<br> <br> <email address="https://www.hassan.senate.gov">Sen. Maggie Hassan</a>, D-New Hampshire, is hosting the discussion about the challenges the media face and the changing views of the public regarding media.<br> <br> The discussion is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. Wednesday in the Kennedy Caucus Room (Russell Senate Office Building: Room 325). The event is free and open to the public.<br> <br> Bethel McKenzie has worked in the journalism industry for over 35 years in the United States and abroad, and has amassed a wealth of knowledge on reporting, editing and managing. <a href="https://www.spj.org/news.asp?ref=1547">She became the first African-American to serve as SPJ’s executive director</a> in March.<br> <br> The <a href="http://www.newseum.org">Newseum’s</a> Director of Public Relations Sonya Gavankar will moderate. Gavankar has hosted programs and given commentary on ABC and CBS affiliates. She also spent several years training millennials for job interviews by making use of personal brand building and social graces.<br> <br> The panel will include other leading industry professionals with extensive knowledge and insight regarding broadcast, print, digital and multimedia journalism.<br> <br> Amy Mitchell, director of journalism research for the <a href="http://www.pewresearch.org">Pew Research Center</a>, will bring her expertise in research design and analysis to the discussion. Also in attendance will be <a href="http://www.tegna.com">TEGNA Inc.</a> President and Chief Executive Officer David Lougee, manager of 46 broadcast television stations in 38 markets across the country.<br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>,<a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a>, or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>.</i><br> <div align"=center">-END-</center><br> Fri, 15 Jun 2018 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ objects to Justice Department secretly confiscating journalist’s records http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1573 Contacts:<br> Rebecca Baker, SPJ National President, 203-640-3904, <email address="rbaker@spj.org">rbaker@spj.org</a><br> Jennifer Royer, SPJ Director of Communications and Marketing, 317-361-4134, <email address="jroyer@spj.org">jroyer@spj.org</a> <br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS – <a href="http://www.spj.org">The Society of Professional Journalists</a> strongly opposes the Department of Justice seizing years' worth of a <a href="https://www.nytimes.com">New York Times reporter’s phone and email records.</a> <br> <br> “Going behind a journalist’s back, in secret, without the reporter or media outlet given the opportunity to fight the intrusion in court, shows the lack of protection for journalists from the federal government,” said Rebecca Baker, SPJ National President. “These actions create a chilling effect between sources and journalists that prevents anyone concerned with the actions of their government from raising concerns.”<br> <br> The New York Times reported that the seizure was disclosed in a letter to the Times reporter, Ali Watkins, who had been in a three-year relationship with former Senate Intelligence Committee aide James A. Wolfe. The seizure suggested that prosecutors under the Trump administration will continue the aggressive tactics employed under President Barack Obama, the Times reported.<br> <br> “The fact that the government is secretly spying on law-abiding journalists by gathering their phone records is reminiscent of the East German Stasi and should raise alarm bells for anyone who values the freedoms we stand for in America,” said David Cuillier, former SPJ president and <a href="https://www.spj.org/com-foi.asp"> SPJ Freedom of Information Committee </a> member. “Unfortunately, this is not the first time this has happened. The Obama administration did the same thing, also to ferret out and discourage government employee leakers.”<br> <br> The situation has prompted some to again stress the need for federal shield laws. Most states offer journalists some protection to do their jobs. But the federal government has never passed similar protections at the national level.<br> <br> Kathryn Foxhall of <a href="http://spjdc.org">SPJ's D.C. Pro Chapter</a> and member of SPJ's FOI Committee, said this type of action by the Justice Department can filter into all areas of government.<br> <br> "This trend toward seizing reporters’ records will intimidate so many potential source people," Foxhall said. "Its damage to the public’s right to understand its government is incalculable. It’s critical to remember that the thus induced silence will include staff members in many parts of government, extending well beyond the national security arena and into subject matters that have no claim of being confidential.” <br> <br> Cuillier said this most recent story is scarier than the typical shield law case, because at least in those cases, the government approaches the news organization up front to demand records. <br> <br> “If Americans value their liberties, their freedom to talk in private with whomever they want, and the ability for journalists to gather information independently in the public interest, then they should speak up and demand their members of Congress put a stop to this and adopt a strong federal shield law,” Cuillier said.<br> <br> <a href="https://www.spj.org/foi.asp">Read more about ways SPJ is working to protect journalists and their sources.</a><br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>, <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a>, or <a href="https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation.</a></i><br> <br> <div align"=center">-END-</div><br> Fri, 8 Jun 2018 00:00:00 -0500 SPJ announces 2017 Mark of Excellence Award winners http://www.spj.org/news.asp?REF=1572 <i> Update 5/30/18: In a previous version of this release, it was mentioned that the Online/Digital News Videography category was still under consideration. Judging is now complete and the results are included below.</i><br> <br> Contacts:<br> Christine Cordial, SPJ Program Coordinator, 317-920-4788, <email address="ccordial@spj.org">ccordial@spj.org</a><br> Jennifer Royer, SPJ Director of Communications and Marketing, 317-361-4134, <email address="jroyer@spj.org">jroyer@spj.org</a><br> <br> INDIANAPOLIS — The <a href="https://www.spj.org/index.asp">Society of Professional Journalists</a> congratulates the <a href="https://www.spj.org/moe17.asp">2017 Mark of Excellence Awards</a> national winners. The MOE Awards honor the best of collegiate journalism within a calendar year.<br> <br> National Mark of Excellence Award winners are chosen from the category winners in each of SPJ’s 12 regions, and the awards are judged by journalism professionals with at least three years of experience. Lists of regional winners can be found in <a href="https://www.spj.org/spjnews.asp">SPJ News</a>.<br> <br> SPJ will recognize first-place national winners at the Student Union event during <a href="http://excellenceinjournalism.org">Excellence in Journalism 2018</a>, Sept. 27-29 in Baltimore.<br> <br> Judges were directed to choose only those entries they considered outstanding work worthy of a national honor. If the judges determined none of the entries rose to this level of excellence, no award was given. Any category not listed has no winner.<br> <br> School divisions are based on student enrollment, which includes both graduate and undergraduate enrollment. Large schools have 10,000+ students and small schools have fewer than 10,000 students.<br> <br> See the list below for details on national winners, and direct any MOE Awards questions to SPJ Program Coordinator Christine Cordial.<br> <br> The list reflects the spelling and titles submitted in the award-entry process.<br> <br> Note: The Online/Digital News Videography category is still under consideration. This list will be updated with the results once they are finalized.<br> <br> <br> <b>Newspapers</b><br> Breaking News Reporting (Large school division)<br> Winner: OSU walkout complete coverage – by The Baro Staff, Oregon State University<br> Finalist: Protesters take a stand, outnumber Spencer supporters - by Ian Cohen, Romy Ellenbogen, David Hoffman and Jimena Tavel, University of Florida<br> Finalist: June flood coverage - by Mitchell Kukulka and McKenzie Sanderson, Central Michigan University<br> <br> Breaking News Reporting (Small school division)<br> Winner: Gas leak interrupts class, spurs evacuations - by Brock Turner, DePauw University<br> Finalist: Historic building collapses in Pomona - by Brooke Grasso and Gabriella Chikhani, University of La Verne<br> Finalist: College Republicans react to notes left on poster - by Katherine Bauer, Drake University<br> <br> General News Reporting (Large school division)<br> Winner: Tracking impact of budget cuts - by Forrest Holt, Cody Cottier and Jessica Zhou, Washington State University<br> Finalist: Succession of scandals hits Auburn Athletics - by Chip Brownlee, Sam Willoughby and Will Sahlie, Auburn University<br> Finalist: Parents push for Texas to screen all newborns for spinal muscular atrophy - by Matthew Choi, Northwestern University<br> <br> General News Reporting (Small school division)<br> Winner: Sexual assault: It happens here, too - by Diego Pineda, Elon University<br> Finalist: Choosing not to sign the covenant - by Mady Fortier, Bethel University<br> Finalist: ROTC adjusts training in era of mass shootings - by Claire Desmarais and Brennan Robinson, University of Portland<br> <br> In-Depth Reporting (Large school division)<br> Winner: ‘It’s Real’: A seven-part look at how sexual assault is handled at the University of Maryland - by Staff of The Diamondback, University of Maryland<br> Finalist: Breaking the silence - by Staff of Marquette Wire, Marquette University<br> Finalist: In the dark: Records shed light on sexual misconduct at Kentucky universities - by Nicole Ares, Western Kentucky University<br> <br> In-Depth Reporting (Small school division)<br> Winner: Define: Gordon, an investigation by The Tartan - by Staff of The Tartan, Gordon College<br> Finalist: The undocumented general - by Hannah Denham, Washington and Lee University<br> Finalist: Behind the blue - by Savanna DiStefano, Harding University<br> <br> Feature Writing (Large school division)<br> Winner: While the Oakland Fire Department takes heat, a new generation of firefighters comes of age - by Rosa Furneaux, UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism<br> Finalist: The Whole Picture: How a cheerleader became the face of Syracuse University on the night of the Pan Am Flight 103 attack - by Satoshi Sugiyama, Syracuse University<br> Finalist: The third life of Darryl Pinkins - by Taylor Telford, Indiana University<br> <br> Feature Writing (Small school division)<br> Winner: Call to the church - by Hannah Sievert, University of Portland<br> Finalist: Christmas trees stop costal erosion in Jefferson Parish - by Colleen Dulle, Loyola University New Orleans<br> Finalist: Discharged from America - by Michael McDonald, Southwestern College<br> <br> Sports Writing (Large school division)<br> Winner: Afraid of the unknown - by Michal Dwojak, University of Illinois<br> Finalist: Unwanted, unconventional and unrelenting: the Michael Wroblewski story - by Orion Sang, University of Michigan<br> Finalist: ‘My escape': How football saved Antwan Cordy’s life - by Jon Mettus, Syracuse University<br> <br> Sports Writing (Small school division)<br> Winner: Tall standards - by Ben Arthur, University of Portland<br> Finalist: Reaching for a dream on her tiptoes - by Maddie DeBilzan, Bethel University<br> Finalist: ‘Knott’ to be denied: Fearless fifth-year talks life in Florida, finally winning Patriot League - by Austin Vitelli, Lehigh University<br> <br> Editorial Writing<br> Winner: Sam Topp, Lehigh University<br> Finalist: The Daily Reveille Editorial Board, Louisiana State University<br> Finalist: Staff of North Texas Daily, University of North Texas<br> <br> General Column Writing (Large school division)<br> Winner: Kyle Hampel, Kansas State University<br> Finalist: Mariana Alfaro, Northwestern University<br> Finalist: Tafari Robertson, Texas State University<br> <br> General Column Writing (Small school division)<br> Winner: Madeleine Lucchetti, Butler University<br> Finalist: Rachel Rippetoe, University of Portland<br> Finalist: Maddie DeBilzan, Carlo Holmberg and Kellie Lawless, Bethel University<br> <br> Sports Column Writing<br> Winner: Ethan Bauer, University of Florida<br> Finalist: Jack McLoone and Alvin Halimwidjaya, Fordham University<br> Finalist: Logan Jones, Utah State University<br> <br> Best All-Around Daily Student Newspaper<br> Winner: The Daily Orange - by Staff, Syracuse University<br> Finalist: Iowa State Daily - by Emily Barske, Iowa State University<br> Finalist: The Daily Evergreen - by Staff, Washington State University<br> <br> Best All-Around Non-Daily Student Newspaper<br> Winner: The Post - by Staff, Ohio University<br> Finalist: The Temple News - by Staff, Temple University<br> Finalist: The Miami Hurricane - by Staff, University of Miami<br> <br> <b>Magazines</b><br> Non-Fiction Magazine Article<br> Winner: Missouri’s opioid epidemic - by Rick Morgan, University of Missouri<br> Finalist: Life amid the levees - by Jacob Shea, UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism<br> Finalist: A water-bottling plant creates a rift in Montana - by Olga Kreimer, University of Montana<br> <br> Best Student Magazine<br> Winner: Focus Magazine: Rebuild - by Staff, Baylor University<br> Finalist: Hill Magazine - by Alex Gladden, University of Arkansas<br> Finalist: Vox Magazine - by Staff, University of Missouri<br> <br> <b>Art/Graphics</b><br> Breaking News Photography (Large school division)<br> Finalist: Hunter sets eyes on governing after SGA presidential win - by Jacob Arthur, University of Alabama<br> Finalist: Urban Meyer walks through enemy lines - by Jack Westerheide, Ohio State University<br> <br> Breaking News Photography (Small school division)<br> Winner: Total eclipse - by Ben Davis, Lipscomb University<br> Finalist: Dreamer - by Natalie Mosqueda, Southwestern College<br> Finalist: Fists rising in fall - by Brenna Sinding, Peninsula College<br> <br> General News Photography (Large school division)<br> Winner: Couple hug in rubble of home - by Dakota McGranahan, Santa Rosa Junior College<br> Finalist: Taking a bite out of the competition - by Antonella Crescimbeni, Penn State<br> Finalist: The people united - by Abby Potter, Western Kentucky University<br> <br> General News Photography (Small school division)<br> Winner: That’s an image that will always be in my head - by Nikole Kost, Point Park University<br> Finalist: Women’s March draws hundreds of people - by Jose Arredondo, Texas A&M University-San Antonio<br> <br> Feature Photography (Large school division)<br> Winner: 'Mutton Busted' (2017 Fiesta de los Vaqueros) - by Rebecca Noble, University of Arizona<br> Finalist: Marching Chips - by Josie Norris, Central Michigan University<br> <br> Feature Photography (Small school division)<br> Winner: Concert glow - by Lauren Franco, Abilene Christian University<br> Finalist: What does the hijab mean to you? - by Annika Gordon, University of Portland<br> Finalist: #WhyWeMarch - by Samantha Reposa, University of New Haven<br> <br> Photo Illustration (Large school division)<br> Winner: War stories - by Hannah Burnett, University of California, Los Angeles<br> Finalist: 3 and out - by Zbigniew Sikora, Oregon State University<br> Finalist: 2017 eclipse - by Kiffer Creveling, University of Utah<br> <br> Photo Illustration (Small school division)<br> Winner: The Mystician 78.6 Reality Check: Reporters Talk Real News - by Hunter Andes and Quinnlyn Nelson, Bismarck State College<br> Finalist: The life and struggles of a domestic abuse survivor - by Emily Rowan, Cabrini University<br> Finalist: Debuting Dorrel - by Lauren Franco, Abilene Christian University<br> <br> Sports Photography (Large school division)<br> Winner: Drake relays - by Emily Blobaum, Iowa State University<br> Finalist: At arm's length - by Kelsea Hobbs, Western Kentucky University<br> Finalist: Little League World Series Champions - by Linsey Fagan, Penn State<br> <br> Sports Photography (Small school division)<br> Finalist: Head above the rest - by Alexander Contreras, Southwestern College<br> <br> Editorial Cartooning<br> Winner: Jake Thrasher, University of Mississippi<br> Finalist: Eva Shen, University of Maryland<br> Finalist: Dan Cordero and Michelle Phillips, Southwestern College<br> <br> <br> <b>Radio</b><br> Radio News Reporting<br> Winner: Strike a chord: Addiction series - by Jonathan Woodward, Fordham University<br> Finalist: Butte holds "wake" for birds killed in the Berkeley Pit - by Nora Saks, University of Montana<br> <br> Radio Feature<br> Winner: Dining with Doyle - by Neil Doyle, Illinois State University<br> Finalist: Peer treatment program offers new hope in Fort Belknap - by Nora Saks, University of Montana<br> Finalist: The appeal of modern obstacle courses - by Hannah Jerome, University of Kansas<br> <br> Radio In-Depth Reporting<br> Winner: When the lights go out, and stay out - by Luke Sullivan, University of Florida<br> Finalist: Grieving father takes on district attorney's office - by Elizabeth Tung, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism<br> Finalist: Mar-a-Lago or Trump Tower: Could a federal law force Trump to choose? - by Madeline Fox, Northwestern University<br> <br> Radio Sports Reporting<br> Winner: Brady's record day - by Adam Rogers, Marshall University<br> Finalist: Columbia College's Girls Who Game event connects teen girls to electronic sports - by Hannah Haynes, University of Missouri<br> Finalist: May the best lifeguard win: Regional competition tests lifesaving skills of south Florida's rescuers - by Allison Light, Princeton University<br> <br> Best All-Around Radio Newscast<br> Winner: Newsline March 13, 2017: Long Island prepares for major snow storm - by WRHU News Team, Hofstra University<br> Finalist: From where we are - by Alana Bracken, William Rehbock, Gabe Gross and Iris Lee, University of Southern California<br> Finalist: November 3, 2017 newscast - by Neil Doyle, Illinois State University<br> <br> <b>Television</b><br> Television Breaking News Reporting<br> Winner: USC active shooter scare - by Sam Bergum, Garrett Schwartz, Taylor Edghill and Kim Rogers, University of Southern California<br> Finalist: Winding Way house fire - by Kinsey Grant, Washington and Lee University<br> Finalist: Pulse anniversary - by Ryan Roberts and Daniela Hurtado, University of Florida<br> <br> Television General News Reporting<br> Winner: ViewFinder: a chief's promise - by Emily Kallmyer, Jojo Dominick and Ryan Eskalis, University of Maryland<br> Finalist: High school sexual assault - by Grant Tosterud, University of Oklahoma<br> Finalist: Women's March on Madison - by Jenna Gaidosh, Tisia Muzinga, Stevan Stojanovic and Jenna Graham, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee<br> <br> Television Feature Reporting<br> Winner: A survivor’s story - by Jamie Weiss, Syracuse University<br> Finalist: Opera - Good Day DePaul - by Dan Beedie, DePaul University<br> Finalist: Bob Benson mirror artist - by Julianne Maxwell, University of Maryland<br> <br> Television In-Depth Reporting<br> Winner: ViewFinder: Aging - by ViewFinder Fall 2017 Team, University of Maryland<br> Finalist: Routes TV: Dirty little secrets - by Jstyn Strain, University of Oklahoma<br> <br> Television Sports Reporting<br> Winner: D'Mauri Jones: Painting inspiration - by David Perez, University of Miami<br> Finalist: Triple threat: Meet Charlee Harris - by Erin Kate Dolan, Penn State University<br> Finalist: Leigh Healey is finally ready to hit the bodybuilding stage - by Grace Choi, Northwestern University<br> <br> Best All-Around Television Newscast<br> Winner: ViewFinder: Opioid crisis - by ViewFinder, University of Maryland<br> Finalist: WUFT News First at Five - by WUFT NEWS Student Staff, University of Florida<br> Finalist: November 23, 2017 broadcast - by Mallory Weil, Tony Sandleben, Ryan McClain and Evan Like, Ball State University<br> <br> <b>Online</b><br> Online News Reporting<br> Winner: Killing Rikers - by Newsroom 2017, Columbia Graduate School of Journalism<br> Finalist: Opioid overdose deaths continue to mount - by Ryan Santistevan and Ben Moffat, Arizona State University<br> Finalist: On her own - by Hallie Miller and Ellie Silverman, University of Maryland<br> <br> Online Feature Reporting<br> Winner: Life and terror: John Paul Mugisha finds a new life on The Bluff - by Rachel Ramirez, University of Portland<br> Finalist: The life and struggles of a domestic abuse survivor - by Caitlyn Huebner, Cabrini University<br> Finalist: Can't get there from here - by Emma Sarappo, Northwestern University<br> <br> Online In-Depth Reporting<br> Winner: Montana's meth effect - by Metheffect.com, University of Montana<br> Finalist: Breakdown - by NYCity News Service Staff, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism<br> Finalist: Keeping kids alive in West Virginia - by Nick Foutrakis, Dalia Elsaid, Zane Coss and Jade Artherhults, West Virginia University<br> <br> Online Sports Reporting<br> Winner: Heisman history - by Joe Buettner, University of Oklahoma<br> <br> Online Opinion & Commentary<br> Winner: State Press Editorial Board, Arizona State University<br> <br> Best Affiliated Web Site<br> Winner: Alpine Living New Zealand - by Jonathan Norris, Taylor Armer, Kaylin Bowen and Hailey Grace Steele, University of Alabama<br> Finalist: The Harvard Crimson - by Staff of The Harvard Crimson, Harvard University<br> Finalist: theshorthorn.com - by Staff of The Shorthorn, UT Arlington<br> <br> Best Independent Online Student Publication<br> Winner: City Blocks - by Staff, Syracuse University<br> Finalist: Media Milwaukee - by Staff, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee<br> Finalist: Urban Plains - by Staff, Drake University<br> <br> Best Use of Multimedia<br> Winner: Closed doors; open questions - by Staff of OR Magazine, University of Oregon<br> Finalist: Our Gainesville - by Staff of WUFT News, University of Florida<br> Finalist: When I am healed - by Abby Potter, Western Kentucky University<br> <br> <b>Videography</b><br> Broadcast News Videography<br> Winner: Solar eclipse - by Ben Johnson and Jordan Davis, College of the Ozarks<br> Finalist: ViewFinder: On the call - by Emily Olsen, University of Maryland<br> Finalist: Trade drives rise of middle class in Mexico - by Lillian Donahue, Arizona State University<br> <br> Broadcast Feature Videography<br> Winner: From the military to the classroom - by Lauren Sinatra, Syracuse University<br> Finalist: ViewFinder: Take you there - by Jay Reed, University of Maryland<br> <br> Broadcast Sports Videography<br> Winner: "Armstrong” – a purpose worthy of pursuit - by Chris Venzon, Syracuse University<br> Finalist: Fighting for fearlessness - by Tyler Paley, Arizona State University<br> Finalist: Feel close to him - by Griffin Wasik, Michigan State University<br> <br> Online/Digital News Videography<br> Winner: Award vacated after winning entry was disqualified.<br> Finalist: Unstable ground in Pinal County - by Melanie Abramoff, Arizona State University<br> Finalist: Convict of 302: Death penalty in Pakistan - by Shakeeb Asrar and Urooj Kamran Azmi, Northwestern University in Qatar<br> <br> Online/Digital Feature Videography<br> Winner: Troubled waters - by Jesse Nichols and Kjell Redal, Western Washington University<br> Finalist: ViewFinder: Going home - by Tina Vo and Pearl Mak, University of Maryland<br> Finalist: Battling fate - by Josh Barnhart, Central Michigan University<br> <br> Online/Digital Sports Videography<br> Winner: GCU's Russell gets 'one shining moment' on Final Four floor - by Zac Pacleb, Arizona State University<br> Finalist: Beating the buzzer: Wizards keep games tight to the end - by Evan J. Berkowitz and Gabe Fernandez, University of Maryland College of Journalism<br> Finalist: Scaling new heights - by Maria Camila Montañez and Carlos Serrano, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism<br> <br> <div align"=center">--END--</div><br> <br> <i>SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to informing citizens; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and fights to protect First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. Support excellent journalism and fight for your right to know. <a href="https://www.spj.org/join.asp">Become a member</a>,<br> <a href= "https://www.spj.org/ldf.asp">give to the Legal Defense Fund</a>, or <a href=" https://www.spj.org/donate.asp">give to the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation</a>.</i><br> <br> Mon, 21 May 2018 00:00:00 -0500